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guys, I'm a programming newbie trying to improve the procedure bellow in a way that when I pass it this argument: split_string("After the flood ... all the colors came out."," .") it returns it:

['After', 'the', 'flood', 'all', 'the', 'colors', 'came', 'out']

and not this:

['After', 'the', 'flood', '', '', '', '', 'all', 'the', 'colors', 'came', 'out', ''] 

Any hint of how to do this? (I could just iterate again the list and delete the '' elements, but I wanted a more elegant solution)

This is the procedure:

def split_string(source, separatorList):
    splited = [source]
    for separator in splitlist:
        source = splited
        splited = []
        print 'separator= ', separator
        for sequence in source:
            print 'sequence = ', sequence
            if sequence not in splitlist and sequence != ' ':
                splited = splited + sequence.split(separator)            
    return splited

print split_string("This is a test-of the,string separation-code!", " ,!-")
print
print split_string("After  the flood   ...  all the colors came out."," .")
share|improve this question
1  
You know that you could use re.split if you want to use multiple separators? –  Felix Kling Mar 17 '12 at 18:46
    
Yes, @FelixKling, now I know that, but I should not use it in this case. I have to figure out a way for myself. Thank you again! –  craftApprentice Mar 17 '12 at 23:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's see where did the empty strings come from first, try to execute this in shell:

>>> 'After the'.split(' ')

result:

['After', '', 'the']

This was because when split method came to ' ' in the string, it find nothing but '' between two spaces.

So the solution is simple, just check the boolean value of every item get from .split(

def split_string(source, separatorList):
    splited = [source]
    for separator in separatorList:
        # if you want to exchange two variables, then write in one line can make the code more clear
        source, splited = splited, []
        for sequence in source:
            # there's no need to check `sequence` in advance, just split it
            # if sequence not in separatorList and sequence != ' ':
                # splited = splited + sequence.split(separator)

            # code to prevent appearance of `''` is here, do a if check in list comprehension.
            # `+=` is equivalent to `= splited +`
            splited += [i for i in sequence.split(separator) if i]
    return splited

More details about [i for i in a_list if i] see PEP 202

share|improve this answer

You can filter out the empty strings in the return statement:

return [x for x in split if x]

As a side note, I think it would be easier to write your function based on re.split():

def split_string(s, separators):
    pattern = "|".join(re.escape(sep) for sep in separators)
    return [x for x in re.split(pattern, s) if x]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, @Sven Marnach, but I'm suppose to not use a filter or re.split() in this homework. So, I'm trying to figure out how not to insert ' ' in the splited list. Once again, thank you for your code. It've helped me think more alternatives to this problem. –  craftApprentice Mar 17 '12 at 23:04
    
@Pythonista'sApprentice: The first code snippet in this answer shows how to filter out the empty strings. –  Sven Marnach Mar 18 '12 at 13:05
print re.split('[. ]+', 'After the flood ... all the colors came out.')

or, better, the other way round

print re.findall('[^. ]+', 'After the flood ... all the colors came out.')
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, @thg435, but I'm suppose not to use re.split() in this homework. So, I'm trying to figure out how not to insert ' ' in the splited list. Once again, thank you for your code. It helped me think more alternatives to this problem. –  craftApprentice Mar 17 '12 at 23:08

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