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I am confused as to this part of exemplary code:

float f = 3.01;
int i;
  • Case 1: i = f * 100; // i == 300
  • Case 2: i = f *= 100; // i == 301

I've no idea why in first case the decimal part gets "lost".
I've also tried:

(double) f * 100
f * 100.0

Then I tried volatile and flags to gcc that turn off all optimization.
The result is still the same.

Can somebody explain to me why does the first case behave so? Thank you.

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Try with this as well: f = 3.01; f = f * 100; i = f; I believe that should focus the question more. –  user166390 Mar 17 '12 at 19:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The issue is in type conversion:

int i = f * 100 ;

is equivalent to

double tmp = f* 100.0;
int i = tmp;

And the difference with second case is that tmp is double! And yes, there is a case, where double is "less precise"

To illustrate this, I wrote the follwing program:

int main()
{
    float f = 3.01;
    float mf = f * 100;
    double md = f * 100;

    int if_ = mf;
    int id = md;

    std::cout << f << ' ' << mf << ' ' << md << ' ' << ' ' << (mf - md) << ' ' << if_ << ' ' << id << '\n';
}

Edit:

On my system I get same result for my gcc 4.6.1 and cl 16.00 (MS VS 10):

3.01 301 301  9.53674e-007 301 300

Edit2

Found, that enabling optimization -O2 eliminates issue. This explains difference with IDEONE.

Here is another code:

int main()
{
    float f = 3.01;
    float mf = f * 100;
    return mf + (f*100);

    //std::cout << f << ' ' << mf << ' ' << md << ' ' << ' ' << (mf - md) << ' ' << if_ << ' ' << id << '\n';
}

And its assembly with -O0

    movl    $0x4040a3d7, %eax
    movl    %eax, 28(%esp)


    flds    28(%esp)
    flds    LC1
    fmulp   %st, %st(1)
    fstps   24(%esp)
    flds    28(%esp)
    flds    LC1
    fmulp   %st, %st(1)
    fadds   24(%esp)
    fnstcw  14(%esp)
    movw    14(%esp), %ax
    movb    $12, %ah
    movw    %ax, 12(%esp)
    fldcw   12(%esp)
    fistpl  8(%esp)
    fldcw   14(%esp)
    movl    8(%esp), %eax

We can see only one explicit conversion to single precision instruction (fspts). This conforms my guess, that temporary evaluates from double, not float.

And with -O2 assembly is pretty simple:

    movl    $602, %eax

And at last

If we disable optimization of evaluting, IDEONE compiler reproduce behavior too:

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Your output: ideone.com/yokdY -- Your program doesn't really show what it is supposed to, does it? ;) –  cooky451 Mar 17 '12 at 19:52
    
@cooky451, Seems to be platfrom dependend: gcc 4.6.1 & cl 16.00 reproduces original error. Will edit post in a minute –  Lol4t0 Mar 17 '12 at 19:57
    
Your point seems strange anyway, since the expression f * 100 is float, not double. Try this: ideone.com/andfC If it gives "d" or "double" on your system, we have the reason. –  cooky451 Mar 17 '12 at 20:07
    
@cooky451, see my edit –  Lol4t0 Mar 17 '12 at 20:17
1  
Interesting. n3242 4.6/1 -> "A prvalue of type float can be converted to a prvalue of type double. The value is unchanged." Which basically means that the compiler can do whatever he wants at this point, if it is allowed for pure rvalues, you cannot even cast to be sure. –  cooky451 Mar 17 '12 at 20:28

I can only guess that in the first example, the temporary result has higher accuracy than float and the result is almost 301 (e.g. 300.999999999999). In the second example the result is put into f (which is a float) and is rounded to 301.

I'm not sure about that but it seems like a fair guess.

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Your second case you take f, which is a float and multiply it by 100, which equals 301, then you put that value into your int i, there is no decimal place so there is no loss of data.

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Yes and this is what I've expected. I am confused why the temporary result (even with an explicit cast) does not behave in the same manner. –  AlexSee Mar 17 '12 at 19:43
    
I've just tried it out myself and I believe in case one, the compiler is taking the float value, and turning it into an int BEFORE multiplying 100 by it, so it turns out to be 300. –  Dave Mar 17 '12 at 19:49
    
If you modify your case 1 to this line: i = abs(f * 100); it works, abs returns the absolute value. –  Dave Mar 17 '12 at 19:57

Compiler bug? It works fine here: http://ideone.com/FlQCL

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