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consider these slightly two different versions of hoisting...

mylocation = "dublin" 
function outputPosition() {
    alert(mylocation);
    mylocation = "fingal" ;
    alert(mylocation);
}
outputPosition();

This will output "fingal" and then "fingal"

mylocation = "dublin" 
function outputPosition() {
    alert(mylocation);
    var mylocation = "fingal" ;
    alert(mylocation);
}
outputPosition();

This will output "undefined" and "fingal"

Why?

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11  
The first one should throw a ReferenceError unless mylocation was already defined somewhere else. –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 17 '12 at 20:20
    
@GGG. check this fiddle –  gdoron Mar 17 '12 at 20:29
    
@gdoron nice work, psychic detective :D –  Dagg Nabbit Mar 17 '12 at 20:32
    
You ruined the question with last your edit, see this fiddle. It doesn't alert what you wrote... by the way, only the second one is about hoisting, the first is about scope –  gdoron Mar 18 '12 at 8:16
    
The output of first one must be "dublin" and "fingal" provided that mylocation is defined,otherwise its a reference error. –  Ashish Dec 11 '12 at 13:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Once you declare variable using var keyword within a javascript function and no matter where you put this declaration - at the top of the function or at the buttom, it will be considered as local variable. So that is why you get undefined when you try to get value of such variable before var declaration.

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In the second option, you hide mylocation (which I hope was declared in outer scope.) with a new variable via the var declaration.

"In JavaScript, variable can be declared after being used." meaning: JavaScript pulls up var declarations to the top of the scope(No matter where it was declared!), so in your second function var mylocation is implicitly defined but not assigned before the first alert, hence it output undefined at that point.

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The output of first snippet must be "dublin" and "fingal" provided that mylocation is defined,otherwise its a reference error.

For more details :

http://bustingseams.blogspot.in/2009/08/another-javascript-pitfall-hoisting.html

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In JavaScript - variable declarations are hoisted but initialization is not. That means that when you write var anywhere inside a function it will be treated as declared in top. So it will not take the same name variable from global space.

@Ashish is right, the first snippet should output "dublin" and "fingal".

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