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I am getting this error:

The ObjectContext instance has been disposed and can no 
longer be used for operations that require a connection.

I understand why I am getting the error. However, what I do not understand is why one situation will cause the error while another will not. Here are the two situations.

Case One (causes error):

        List<SomeObject> someobjects;
        using (var gm = new GenericRepository<SomeObject>())
        {
            someobjects = gm.Get().ToList();
        }
        vm.SomeObjectSelectList = slf.getSpecificList(someobjects);

What is happening here is a List<> is being filled from a database using a generic repository. After that, the list is then sent to a factory (slf) for creating select lists that are used in the view model (vm). When used in this fashion, the error above occurs. The reason is that inside of the factory there is this line of code:

w => w.Date + " " + w.Child.FirstName + " " + w.Child.LastName);

Although the list of someobjects is sent just fine, its nested objects are not, and when the call to .Child is called the db context is called and the error is caused.

Case Two (causes no error):

        List<SomeObject> someobjects;
        using (var gm = new GenericRepository<SomeObject>())
        {
            someobjects = gm.Get().ToList();
            vm.SomeObjectSelectList = slf.getSpecificList(someobjects);
        }

In this case, no error is caused. However, from the first case it is obvious that the database context is being contacted.

How does the factory have access to the context when the context is inside of the repository?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The factory doesn't have access to the context - it is someobjects that internally uses the context to retrieve the property values when you first access them. Since your context is disposed after the using block, trying to access the properties then will throw an exception.

You can imagine e.g. the Child property implementation to be something like this:

private Person _child = null;
public Person Child
{
    get
    {
        return _child ?? GetandSetChildFromContext();
    }
}

The value of Child is retrieved lazily from the context only when needed - if you want to eagerly include related properties use an Include() query - this is advisable i.e. if you know already that you will need certain related properties every time. This is somewhat made difficult by the fact that you use a repository layer on top of EF - make sure that repository supports Include queries.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess it does seem kind of obvious when you put it like that lol, I am not sure why I didn't remember that. So basically the someobjects object is holding on to the context and because of that the context is passed into the factory with someobjects. – Travis J Mar 17 '12 at 21:23
    
Is it bad practice to do that? – Travis J Mar 17 '12 at 21:24
    
@TravisJ: It depends - you should make sure that all DB queries are executed when you still have access to the context - there shouldn't be any querying i.e. from your view ;-) – BrokenGlass Mar 17 '12 at 21:28
    
I agree! Querying from the view is terribad :) To clarify though, I was asking it was bad practice to use Case 2 above where the context is kept alive when the factory call is made (and then disposed of right after). – Travis J Mar 17 '12 at 21:29
    
The only downside is that you are making several calls to the DB which will not be as performant as getting all the data you need at once - if that doesn't worry you it's ok – BrokenGlass Mar 17 '12 at 21:31

The Problem is that the using statement dispose your object and when you say someobjects = gm.Get().ToList(); it will not copy it but just use a reference if you want to make it work for example 1 to work you will have to clone the object into a new instance.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't cloning the object also keep the objectcontext alive? – Travis J Mar 17 '12 at 21:26
    
@TravisJ Depends on what you clone but if you need the gm.Get().Tolist() you will need to clone isntead of refering it because the using statement dispose's the gm variable and so you will have a null reference – Svexo Mar 17 '12 at 21:33

The entity retrieves child data through lazy loading.

share|improve this answer

Instead of creating instance of repository in one method where it's scope is limited, you can create instance as private member of controller class and you can dispose repository inside OnDispose method of controller which will ensure proper handling of your repository.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want any longstanding database connections and prefer microtransactions. – Travis J Mar 17 '12 at 21:32
    
Long lasting? Who said its long lasting? Controller's life cycle is small only for one action, second for micro transaction you can use transaction scope, leaving object context does not keep database connection open for long, only in query or submit changes connection is opened and closed immediately. – Akash Kava Mar 18 '12 at 6:21

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