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Consider this C construct that checks for errors before doing actual work:

int function(struct Context *context,struct Connection *conn)
{
    int retval;

    switch(0)
    {   
    	case 0:
    		retval = BUFFER_INACTIVE;
    		if(conn->mSocket == -1) 
    			break;
    		retval = BUFFER_FULL;
    		/* Is there enough room to add ? */
    		if((context->mMaxBufferSize - conn->mSendPacketLength) < aPacketLength)
    			break;

    		/* Is the send packet buffer half sent? */
    		if(conn->mSendPacketLength > 0 && conn->mSendPacketPos != conn->mSendPacket)
    			break;

    		/* Do some work here */
    		retval = BUFFER_DONE;
    }
    /* Do some things before returning */
    printf("%d",retval);
    return retval;
}

Would you consider this a being readable? Would the alternatives, using goto or stacked if() be better?

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I'm really not afraid of gotos... I tough of this construct and wanted some feedback. –  0x6adb015 Jun 10 '09 at 13:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I've never seen the switch solution, but I've done stuff like this:

do {
    err = func();
    if( err ) break;
    err = func2();
    if( err ) break;
    ...
} while( 0 );
if( err ) {
   // handle errors
}

But what's the real difference between that and this:

err = func();
if( err ) goto done;
err = func2();
if( err ) goto done;
...
done:
if( err ) {
   //handle errors;
}

The first is just the second one rewritten to avoid using the keyword goto, and I'd argue that the goto solution is more readable. It took me a while, but I've managed to convince myself that gotos are not always evil.

In the end, I prefer just using if statements if possible since it makes the code more readable, but gotos if necessary.

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I would say that is less readable. I think using a if statements or even a goto would be a much more suitable approach. Using goto's is not the end of the world and is perfectly acceptable and appropriate for error handling.

http://kerneltrap.org/node/553/2131

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I agree that if somebody sees that switch(), it would take some time to decipher what it does. –  0x6adb015 Jun 10 '09 at 13:13

I would recommend you to use while(true) instead of switch:

while(true)
{   
            retval = BUFFER_INACTIVE;
            if(conn->mSocket == -1) 
                    break;
            retval = BUFFER_FULL;
            /* Is there enough room to add ? */
            if((context->mMaxBufferSize - conn->mSendPacketLength) < aPacketLength)
                    break;

            /* Is the send packet buffer half sent? */
            if(conn->mSendPacketLength > 0 && conn->mSendPacketPos != conn->mSendPacket)
                    break;

            /* Do some work here */
            retval = BUFFER_DONE;
            break;
}
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1  
I think the while(true) will lead somebody to expect looping, which this definitely does not do. Using "do { ... } while (0);" is more idiomatic. –  David Thornley Jun 10 '09 at 14:33
    
Agree, do { ... } while (0); is better way to do it. –  Gordon Freeman Jun 10 '09 at 15:07
2  
do { ... while (0); is also the best practice for containing scope in a macro ... –  Jamie Jun 10 '09 at 16:08

Another alternative is wrapping it in a function and returning instead of breaking. This is often a bad idea since it ends up adding an unnecessary layer of abstraction. However, in some cases it can make things simpler.

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An alternative is to use cascaded ifs:

u8 u8IsOk;

u8IsOk = Func1();

if(u8IsOk)
{
    /* Do some stuff...*/
    u8IsOk = Func2();
} /* if */

if(u8IsOk)
{
    /* Do some stuff...*/
    u8IsOk = Func3();
} /* if */

...and so on. Not as efficient as some other methods, but avoids excessive nesting, goto, break, while(0) and multiple returns.

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Why the downvote? –  Steve Melnikoff Jun 10 '09 at 18:40
2  
Maybe it's because of the ugly pseudo-Hungarian notation... –  Graeme Perrow Jun 10 '09 at 18:51
    
I've been surprised how much people seem to dislike it. It's quite common in embedded software. –  Steve Melnikoff Jun 10 '09 at 19:00

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