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I am looking for way to create the according attr_reader methods while setting the values for the according instance variables in the initialize method? For example, the following code:

class SomeClass
  attr_reader :hello
  def initialize( arg)
    @hello = arg
  end
end

I am looking for way to write as follows:

class SomeClass
  def initialize( arg)
    some_method_as_described_in_question( @hello, arg) 
  end
end   

Does a method doing what I have described exist in the Ruby built-in Classes and Modules?

share|improve this question
    
nope, there is no such method. –  Dominik Honnef Mar 17 '12 at 22:53
    
This seems like something very convient to have, is it an issue with access control? Why is it not included? –  rudolph9 Mar 17 '12 at 23:00
1  
It would probably be weird to include a method that you call in an instance method (initialize) that changes things on the class, i.e. on other instances as well. Or do you only want it to set a reader on the current instance? You could do that with define_singleton_method in Ruby 1.9: gist.github.com/be3485dde76c0da72a00 Perhaps you could clarify the question? –  Henrik N Mar 17 '12 at 23:13
    
@KurtRudolph, because it's not clear exactly what that would do. If it's supposed to add a fully-fledged attribute reader in the class, then it doesn't make sense to put it in the initialize method. Then every time you create a new object, it would be doing the same attribute assignment on the class level. If you want to do it on the eigenclass for reason of dynamically setting attribute readers per instance, see my answer. If it's just for "convenience" then it doesn't even make sense, since it would doing something useless or different. –  Ben Lee Mar 17 '12 at 23:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can open the eigenclass from within the method and set the attribute there:

class SomeClass
  def initialize(arg)
    (class << self; self; end).send(:attr_reader, :hello)
    @hello = arg
  end
end

That way each instance's eigenclass will have that attribute reader. But really it only makes sense to do things that way if the attribute name is dynamic, and can vary from instance to instance. If it's always hello, I don't see any drawback to just defining it in the class like your original code block.

For example, if you are dynamically passing in the attribute name, you could do it like this:

class SomeClass
  def initialize(attr, arg)
    (class << self; self; end).send(:attr_reader, attr.to_sym)
    instance_variable_set("@#{attr}", arg)
  end
end

This is compatible with Ruby 1.8. Taking a tip from @HenrikN in the comment to your question, you can use define_singleton_method in Ruby 1.9:

class SomeClass
  def initialize(attr, arg)
    define_singleton_method(attr) { instance_variable_get("@#{attr}") }
    instance_variable_set("@#{attr}", arg)
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Very VERY NICE! For my own understanding will you confirm if this is correct or not: class << self in a sense creates an additional definition for the class that is it's self, return the object that is the definition object of it's self and through send(:attr_reader, :hello) creates the desired attr_reader? –  rudolph9 Mar 17 '12 at 23:23
    
@KurtRudolph, yeah that's pretty much right. Just make sure you understand that every object instance has it's very own class. You can put method there that only affect that instance, not other instances of the class. And "class << self" is how you open the eigenclass (and as you said, it returns a reference to itself, then uses send to create the desired attribute reader). –  Ben Lee Mar 17 '12 at 23:25
1  
@KurtRudolph, I undid your edit to my answer. Your edit was different, not just simpler. Henrik's gist that you linked to makes it so "hello" always returns the initial value of arg, so it works completely different than an attribute reader. The way I have it, it works identically to an attribute reader, so you can set @hello = ... and get the expected obj.hello attribute. –  Ben Lee Mar 19 '12 at 8:18
    
Thank you for your response, you have repeated answered my questions and each time you answers are well worded and thorough. Not only that, you take the time to help me understand the why of the questions going beyond simply telling me how to fix the current issue. Cheers BenLee –  rudolph9 Mar 21 '12 at 14:09
    
@KurtRudolph, no problem! –  Ben Lee Mar 21 '12 at 15:53
require 'ostruct'

p = OpenStruct.new
p.hello = 'world'
p.could_be_anything = 'nothing'
puts p.hello #=> 'world'
puts p.could_be_anything #=> 'nothing'
share|improve this answer

Not sure if I understand the question, but you can use Struct to get an initializer and accessor methods:

class SomeClass < Struct.new(:hello)
end

x = SomeClass.new("yo")
puts x.hello  # "yo"
x.hello = "what up"
puts x.hello  # "what up"
share|improve this answer
    
This is not what I'm looking for. I partially want it for dynamic purposes and I partially want it just because I'm trying not repeat my self by just stating in one command that the along with the instance variable there should be according methods allowing access to it, i.e p = SomeClass.new 'world'; puts p.hello' should output the string world` without having to state separately attr_reader :hello and @hello = arg –  rudolph9 Mar 17 '12 at 23:07

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