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I was wondering if anyone had put together something or had seen something equivalent to the JavaScript parseInt for C#.

Specifically, i'm looking to take a string like:

123abc4567890

and return only the first valid integer

123

I have a static method I've used that will return only the numbers:

public static int ParseInteger( object oItem )
	{
		string sItem = oItem.ToString();

		sItem = Regex.Replace( sItem, @"([^\d])*", "" );

		int iItem = 0;

		Int32.TryParse( sItem, out iItem );

		return iItem;
	}

The above would take:

ParseInteger( "123abc4567890" );

and give me back

1234567890

I'm not sure if it's possible to do with a regular expression, or if there is a better method to grab just the first integer from the string.

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Thanks for all the answers, they were all very helpful. I marked leppie's as accepted because it was first by a bit and did work. I took his and ran with that with some modifications. Jon Skeet's is definitely the most complete. Thanks again! –  Doozer Blake Jun 10 '09 at 13:29
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7 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You are close.

You probably just want:

foreach (Match match in Regex.Matches(input, @"^\d+"))
{
  return int.Parse(match.Value);
}
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4  
That will convert "ab12cd" to 12 won't it? That may well be the desired behaviour - I'm not sure. I'm only asking because my version only works if the number is at the start of the string. –  Jon Skeet Jun 10 '09 at 13:19
    
Ahh, you are right, a ^ at the start of the RE qould probably be good enough :) Thanks –  leppie Jun 10 '09 at 13:23
    
leppie: I wasn't suggesting that was required, so much as that your implementation's behaviour may well be desirable, and I wanted to check :) –  Jon Skeet Jun 10 '09 at 13:24
2  
You can't use var in that foreach because Regex.Matches returns a MatchCollection that is a non generic ICollection. As it happens I blogged about this yesterday: alicebobandmallory.com/articles/2009/06/09/… –  Jonas Elfström Jun 10 '09 at 19:25
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Here's a complete example. It will throw an exception if you don't give it a valid string - you can change this behaviour by not explicitly throwing an exception in ParseInteger, and using int.TryParse instead.

Note that it allows a leading - sign as well, but not a leading +. (Again, easy to change.)

Also note that although I've got three test cases for success situations, I haven't got any test cases for failure.

Finally, it won't match "abc123def". If you want it to, remove the ^ from the regex.

using System;
using System.Text;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

class Test
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Check("1234abc", 1234);
        Check("-12", -12);
        Check("123abc456", 123);
    }

    static void Check(string text, int expected)
    {
        int actual = ParseInteger(text);
        if (actual != expected)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Expected {0}; got {1}", expected, actual);
        }
    }

    private static readonly Regex LeadingInteger = new Regex(@"^(-?\d+)");

    static int ParseInteger(string item)
    {
        Match match = LeadingInteger.Match(item);
        if (!match.Success)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Not an integer");
        }
        return int.Parse(match.Value);
    }
}
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can you tell me, if there's any difference in the runtime/performance between yours, accepted and mine? does internally regex works exactly the way i posted? –  Andreas Niedermair Jun 17 '09 at 5:58
    
You'd have to benchmark it to find out the performance. I don't know the details of how .NET regexes are implemented. It will depend on the options though - in this case I haven't specified that it should be compiled, which would probably help performance after the initial hit of compilation. –  Jon Skeet Jun 17 '09 at 6:31
    
as you wrote a benchmark-suite: would you possibly run this test in some free time for me? –  Andreas Niedermair Jun 17 '09 at 13:09
    
That benchmark suite is still very much under development, I'm afraid. With the revisions for C# in Depth for the second edition, I don't really have any spare time for this at the moment. Sorry :( –  Jon Skeet Jun 17 '09 at 14:16
    
ah ... that's ok ... i'll have a look at it on my own, when i got time! –  Andreas Niedermair Jun 18 '09 at 5:42
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A slight change to Jon Skeet's excellent solution is in order.

I would change the regex to (as mentioned by Jon):

@"^([^\d]+)?(+|-)?\d+"

This allows for the case of leading characters ahead of the first occurrence of a digit
(e.g., asb12354 -> 12354) and both signed integer cases (e.g. + or -)

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    public static int ParseInteger( object oItem )
    {
            int iItem = 0;
            if (oItem != null) {
                    Int32.TryParse( Regex.Match( oItem.ToString(), @"\d+" ).Value, out iItem );
            }
            return iItem;
    }
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You could use this RegEx ("\A\d+") to find numbers at the beginning of a string.

You can then use int.Parse() to convert that string into an actual integer.

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int nr = Int32.Parse(yourstring);
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You DON'T have to write your own int parse function!!!!

I know this thread is pretty old. but there are some simple way to do this:

int.Parse(urString);
use short.Parse(urString); //if you want a short

Or: //use those depend on your situation:

Convert.ToInt16();
Convert.ToInt32();
Convert.ToInt64();
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All of these will fail given the sample string "123abc4567890", hence the need for something custom. –  Doozer Blake May 30 '12 at 22:57
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