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From what I have read, and the way I understand how memory structures work, the vector creates an array where all the values are aligned after each other, while the linked list I have put together below will point to a random point in memory where the next object is allocated. Hence the vector should be faster for this code.

When I compile the following code I get runtimes of 4 sec for the linked list, while the vector runs in 21 sec, thats a 5 times speed increase for the vector.

Am I missing something here? Or does anyone have an explanation for this?

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>

using namespace std;

struct point{
    float t;
    float v;
};

struct pointlist{
    float t;
    float v;
    struct pointlist *next;
};

void fillpoints(std::vector<struct point> &points, struct pointlist *pointlist) {
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i<8;i++) {
        struct point newpoint; // Fill vector
        newpoint.t = (float)i;
        newpoint.v = (float)i/2;
        points.push_back(newpoint);

        pointlist->t = (float)i; // Fill linked list
        pointlist->v = (float)i/2;
        struct pointlist *temppoint = (struct pointlist *)malloc(sizeof(struct pointlist));
        pointlist->next = temppoint;
        pointlist = temppoint;
    }

    struct point newpoint;
    newpoint.t = 0;
    newpoint.v = (float)i/2;
    points.push_back(newpoint);
    pointlist->t = 0;
    pointlist->v = (float)i/2;
    pointlist->next = NULL;
}

float areavec(std::vector<struct point> pointlist) {
    float y1, z1, y2, z2, area;

    area = 0;
    y2 = pointlist[0].t - pointlist[0].v;
    z2 = pointlist[0].t + pointlist[0].v;

    for (unsigned int i = 1; i<pointlist.size();i++) {
        y1 = y2;
        z1 = z2;
        y2 = pointlist[i].t - pointlist[i].v;
        z2 = pointlist[i].t + pointlist[i].v;
        area += (y1*z2) - (y2*z1);
    }
    return area;
}

float arealist(struct pointlist *pointlist) {
    float y1, z1, y2, z2, area;

    area = 0;
    y2 = pointlist->t - pointlist->v;
    z2 = pointlist->t + pointlist->v;

    while (pointlist->next != NULL) {
        y1 = y2;
        z1 = z2;
        y2 = pointlist->next->t - pointlist->next->v;
        z2 = pointlist->next->t + pointlist->next->v;
        area += (y1*z2) - (y2*z1);

        pointlist = pointlist->next;
    }
    return area;
}

void main() {
    int runs = 200000000;
    float a;
    std::vector<struct point> points;
    struct pointlist *pointlist = (struct pointlist *)malloc(sizeof(struct pointlist));

    struct pointlist *test = pointlist;
    fillpoints(points, pointlist);

    clock_t start = clock();
    for (int i=0; i<runs; i++) {
        a = arealist(pointlist);
    }
    cout << "Time: " << (clock()-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC << " Area: " << a << endl;

    start = clock();
    for (int i=0; i<runs; i++) {
        a = areavec(points);
    }
    cout << "Time: " << (clock()-start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC << " Area: " << a << endl;

    cin.get();
}
share|improve this question
    
Why not compare your list with std::list instead? Also, have you tried to time it when using iterators instead of indexes for the vector, or with optimization turned on? –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 18 '12 at 1:08
    
If you're trying to measure the speed of traversing elements, you should make your lists much, much larger than just 8 elements (unless that the size your lists will typically have in your program). –  Emile Cormier Mar 18 '12 at 1:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted
float areavec(std::vector<struct point> pointlist)

Here, I'll fix that:

float areavec(const std::vector<struct point>& pointlist)

You were copying the vector 200000000 times. Whereas with the linked list, you were just copying a pointer.

share|improve this answer
1  
...showing once again that it's always possible to do A poorly and perform worse than B done well, without saying anything whether A is better or worse than B. –  Kerrek SB Mar 18 '12 at 1:17

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