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getaddrinfo() returns EAI_NONAME for both network error when resolving an existing host and a non existing host.

What should I do to be able to differentiate between those two errors?

Because when the host does not exist I want to fail and when there is a network error I want to continue trying to resolve.

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how are you detecting the error? is it in a try-catch ? – Lyuben Todorov Mar 18 '12 at 1:13
    
@Lyuben Todorov, this is C, but even then this is not the point of the question – Eduardo Mar 18 '12 at 11:08
    
Take a look at libunbound. – jweyrich Mar 19 '12 at 3:49
    
@jweyrich, I am having the same issue with libunbound as with getaddrinfo() Do you have sample code? – Eduardo Mar 19 '12 at 17:52

With classic DNS you can't do this. To the end resolver you really can't distinguish between whether a host exists or whether there was a network failure.

However, with DNSSEC you actually can (assuming the zone was securely signed). You'll need a validating library that can do this for you, and it'll still fail to give you accurate results for unsigned zones (which are unfortunately many in number). But for signed ones you'll get different results depending on whether the name existed or whether there was a network failure. DNSSEC contains a number of records that are used to prove something doesn't exist.

As an example, the libval library that comes from The DNSSEC-Tools Project has a val_getaddrinfo() that will tell you whether the result was validated or not. If no answer existed and it was validated then you can trust that it really doesn't exist. There is a sample getaddr command line application that can be used to test the results as well as study the code.

stackoverflow.com is, sadly, unsigned:

# getaddr wwwxxx.stackoverflow.com
Return code = -2
Validator status code = 134 (VAL_NONEXISTENT_NAME_NOCHAIN)
Error in val_getaddrinfo(): -2

And the error code indicates that (the "nochain" part). That could have failed either because it didn't exist or because the network had issues.

But for signed zones, you'll get a better response:

# getaddr wwwxxx.dnssec-tools.org
Return code = -2
Validator status code = 132 (VAL_NONEXISTENT_NAME)
Error in val_getaddrinfo(): -2

Here the validator status changed and we can be sure the address really didn't exist.

Note that .com, .org and .net are all signed, which means you can always determine if a given something.com exists (but maybe not subname.something.com).

There are other libraries that provide DNSSEC support as well, but I'm most familiar with libval, which is why I used it above.

The DNS is actually quite complex to fully understand how and why it works, and even more so when you add the secured version of it. There isn't a simple reference to an answer, but you need to read at least RFCs 1034 and 1035 and understand the RCODE #3, which is NXDOMAIN and realize it's returned by a resolver that you're querying through and there is no other answer tha the resolver is allowed to give you.

If you want starting points for reading, you can check out:

RFC1034 Domain names - concepts and facilities. P.V. Mockapetris. November 1987. (Format: TXT=129180 bytes) (Obsoletes RFC0973, RFC0882, RFC0883) (Updated by RFC1101, RFC1183, RFC1348, RFC1876, RFC1982, RFC2065, RFC2181, RFC2308, RFC2535, RFC4033, RFC4034, RFC4035, RFC4343, RFC4035, RFC4592, RFC5936) (Also STD0013) (Status: STANDARD)

RFC1035 Domain names - implementation and specification. P.V. Mockapetris. November 1987. (Format: TXT=125626 bytes) (Obsoletes RFC0973, RFC0882, RFC0883) (Updated by RFC1101, RFC1183, RFC1348, RFC1876, RFC1982, RFC1995, RFC1996, RFC2065, RFC2136, RFC2181, RFC2137, RFC2308, RFC2535, RFC2845, RFC3425, RFC3658, RFC4033, RFC4034, RFC4035, RFC4343, RFC5936, RFC5966) (Also STD0013) (Status: STANDARD)

RFC4033 DNS Security Introduction and Requirements. R. Arends, R. Austein, M. Larson, D. Massey, S. Rose. March 2005. (Format: TXT=52445 bytes) (Obsoletes RFC2535, RFC3008, RFC3090, RFC3445, RFC3655, RFC3658, RFC3755, RFC3757, RFC3845) (Updates RFC1034, RFC1035, RFC2136, RFC2181, RFC2308, RFC3225, RFC3007, RFC3597, RFC3226) (Updated by RFC6014) (Status: PROPOSED STANDARD)

RFC4034 Resource Records for the DNS Security Extensions. R. Arends, R. Austein, M. Larson, D. Massey, S. Rose. March 2005. (Format: TXT=63879 bytes) (Obsoletes RFC2535, RFC3008, RFC3090, RFC3445, RFC3655, RFC3658, RFC3755, RFC3757, RFC3845) (Updates RFC1034, RFC1035, RFC2136, RFC2181, RFC2308, RFC3225, RFC3007, RFC3597, RFC3226) (Updated by RFC4470, RFC6014) (Status: PROPOSED STANDARD)

RFC4035 Protocol Modifications for the DNS Security Extensions. R. Arends, R. Austein, M. Larson, D. Massey, S. Rose. March 2005. (Format: TXT=130589 bytes) (Obsoletes RFC2535, RFC3008, RFC3090, RFC3445, RFC3655, RFC3658, RFC3755, RFC3757, RFC3845) (Updates RFC1034, RFC1035, RFC2136, RFC2181, RFC2308, RFC3225, RFC3007, RFC3597, RFC3226) (Updated by RFC4470, RFC6014) (Status: PROPOSED STANDARD)

RFC5155 DNS Security (DNSSEC) Hashed Authenticated Denial of Existence. B. Laurie, G. Sisson, R. Arends, D. Blacka. March 2008. (Format: TXT=112338 bytes) (Status: PROPOSED STANDARD)

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If the host tool can differentiate between both: host www.nonexistantdomain.com Host www.nonexistantdomain.com not found: 3(NXDOMAIN) host www.nonexistantdomain.com ;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached I do not understand why you say it cannot be done? – Eduardo Mar 18 '12 at 11:19
    
I am giving a negative vote because you provided no reference why this is not possible. Please, provide a reference. – Eduardo Mar 18 '12 at 11:48
    
I've added some references, but I'm not sure you're going to like it. There isn't a "quick" reference. It's not a simple system. – Wes Hardaker Mar 19 '12 at 3:26
    
I do not need all the DNS related RFCs. I just need something that shows why you say this is not possible. – Eduardo Mar 19 '12 at 10:42
    
There is not a document or book that *I know of that says it in a single sentence. Sorry. There may be one, of course, but I just don't know of it. Actually, if you're willing to resolve directly in the application itself it's slightly more possible because you can find the final NS that should have the answer and ask it. You'll note if you never get a response or not. But 1) most applications query through local ISP resolvers (as they should) and 2) some environments (especially hotels) prevent you from querying yourself anyway. – Wes Hardaker Mar 19 '12 at 14:11
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I found out that http://c-ares.haxx.se/ is able to differentiate between ARES_ETIMEOUT and ARES_ENOTFOUND unlike getaddrinfo()

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