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I am trying to find everywhere my data has a 90 in column 2 and two lines above change the value of column 2. For example in my data below, if I see 90 at line 11 I want to change my column 2 value at line 9 from 11 to 5. I have a predetermined set of values I want to change the number to; the values will always be 10,11,12,30,31,32 to 1,2,3,4,5,6 respectably.

My data

 #      Type    Response        Acc     RT      Offset    
   1      70  0    0   0.0000 57850
   2      31  0    0   0.0000 59371
   3      41  0    0   0.0000 60909
   4      70  0    0   0.0000 61478
   5      31  0    0   0.0000 62999 
   6      41  0    0   0.0000 64537
   8      70  0    0   0.0000 65106
   9      11  0    0   0.0000 66627
  10      21  0    0   0.0000 68165
  11      90  0    0   0.0000 68700
  12      31  0    0   0.0000 70221

What I want

 #      Type    Response        Acc     RT      Offset    
   1      70  0    0   0.0000 57850
   2      31  0    0   0.0000 59371
   3      41  0    0   0.0000 60909
   4      70  0    0   0.0000 61478
   5      31  0    0   0.0000 62999 
   6      41  0    0   0.0000 64537
   8      70  0    0   0.0000 65106
   9       5  0    0   0.0000 66627
  10      21  0    0   0.0000 68165
  11      90  0    0   0.0000 68700
  12      31  0    0   0.0000 70221

I have been trying to store the previous line and use that as a reference but I can only go back one line, and I need to go back two. Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question
    
Your translation sequences 10,11,12,30,31,32 to 1,2,3,4,5,6 don't coincide with your requirement to change 11 to 5 –  Peter.O Mar 18 '12 at 3:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should work:

function pra(a) {
  for(e in a) {
    printf "%s ", a[e];
  }
  print ""; 
}
BEGIN {
  vals[10] = 1;
  vals[11] = 2;
  vals[12] = 3;
  vals[30] = 4;
  vals[31] = 5;
  vals[32] = 6;
}
NR == 1 { split($0, a, " ") }
NR == 2 { split($0, b, " ") }
NR > 2 { 
  if($2 == "90") {
    a[2] = vals[a[2]];
  }
  pra(a);
  al = 0;
  for(i in a) al++;
  for(i = 1; i <= al; i++) {
    a[i] = b[i];
  }
  split($0, b, " ");
}
END {
  pra(a);
  pra(b);
}

The rundown of how this works: * BEGING block - assign the translation values to vals * NR == 1 and NR == 2 - remember the first two lines into split arrays a and b * NR > 2 - for all lines after the first two * If the second column has value 90, change it using the translation array * Move elements of array b to a and split the current line into b * END block - print a and b, which are basically last two lines

Sample run:

$ cat inp && awk -f mkt.awk inp 
 #      Type    Response        Acc     RT      Offset    
   1      70  0    0   0.0000 57850
   2      31  0    0   0.0000 59371
   3      41  0    0   0.0000 60909
   4      70  0    0   0.0000 61478
   5      31  0    0   0.0000 62999 
   6      41  0    0   0.0000 64537
   8      70  0    0   0.0000 65106
   9      11  0    0   0.0000 66627
  10      21  0    0   0.0000 68165
  11      90  0    0   0.0000 68700
  12      31  0    0   0.0000 70221

# Type Response Acc RT Offset 
1 70 0 0 0.0000 57850 
2 31 0 0 0.0000 59371 
3 41 0 0 0.0000 60909 
4 70 0 0 0.0000 61478 
5 31 0 0 0.0000 62999 
6 41 0 0 0.0000 64537 
8 70 0 0 0.0000 65106 
9 2 0 0 0.0000 66627 
10 21 0 0 0.0000 68165 
11 90 0 0 0.0000 68700 
12 31 0 0 0.0000 70221 

You can do something like this:

function pra(a) {
  printf "%4d%8d%3d%5d%9.4f%6d\n", a[1], a[2], a[3], a[4], a[5], a[6]
}
BEGIN {
  vals[10] = 1;
  vals[11] = 2;
  vals[12] = 3;
  vals[30] = 4;
  vals[31] = 5;
  vals[32] = 6;
}
NR == 1 { print }
NR == 2 { split($0, a, " ") }
NR == 3 { split($0, b, " ") }
NR > 4 {
  if($2 == "90") {
    a[2] = vals[a[2]];
  }
  pra(a);
  for(i = 1; i <= 6; i++) {
    a[i] = b[i];
  }
  split($0, b, " ");
}
END {
  pra(a);
  pra(b);
}

To make it work for this specific case that includes formatting. Sample run:

$ cat inp && awk -f mkt.awk inp 
 #      Type    Response        Acc     RT      Offset    
   1      70  0    0   0.0000 57850
   2      31  0    0   0.0000 59371
   3      41  0    0   0.0000 60909
   4      70  0    0   0.0000 61478
   5      31  0    0   0.0000 62999 
   6      41  0    0   0.0000 64537
   8      70  0    0   0.0000 65106
   9      11  0    0   0.0000 66627
  10      21  0    0   0.0000 68165
  11      90  0    0   0.0000 68700
  12      31  0    0   0.0000 70221 
 #      Type    Response        Acc     RT      Offset    
   1      70  0    0   0.0000 57850
   2      31  0    0   0.0000 59371
   4      70  0    0   0.0000 61478
   5      31  0    0   0.0000 62999
   6      41  0    0   0.0000 64537
   8      70  0    0   0.0000 65106
   9       2  0    0   0.0000 66627
  10      21  0    0   0.0000 68165
  11      90  0    0   0.0000 68700
  12      31  0    0   0.0000 70221
share|improve this answer
    
Wow thank you for replying so quickly. I tried your code, is it possible to keep the formatting of the data as I showed above? When I ran your code it gave me an output with the data and header rearranged (Acc RT Offset # Type Response 0 0.0000 43991 1 55 0). Also, is it possible to give me a breakdown of how the code runs? Also, thank you so much, it did work for the most part. –  user1269741 Mar 18 '12 at 3:07
    
Thanks - see the edit, hope that gives you something to work off of. –  icyrock.com Mar 18 '12 at 3:27
    
Note: It makes a bad substitution when the field in question is not in the list 10,11,12,30,31,32 ... It replaces whatever number was there with 0 ... He mentions that the given list has definite substitutes, but I'm not sure if he means that the list contains the only possible values... (It's worth a mention if there can be other values). –  Peter.O Mar 18 '12 at 7:51
    
Thank you so much, the second code work allowing me to keep the formatting. My values are all 10,11,12,30,31,32 so there is no issue in this part but thank you for your concerns and I will be on the look out for them in the future. Also thank you for the breakdown that was very helpful. –  user1269741 Mar 18 '12 at 13:38
    
Sure thing, glad to help! –  icyrock.com Mar 18 '12 at 14:13

This version maintains your original formatting

awk 'BEGIN{ new[" 1"]="10"; new[" 2"]="11"; new[" 3"]="12"
            new[" 4"]="30"; new[" 5"]="31"; new[" 6"]="32" }
     { line[-2]=line[-1]; line[-1]=line[0]; line[0]=$0 } 
     $2==90 { if( match( line[-2], /^ *[0-9]+ +[1-6] / ) ) { 
                  old=substr( line[-2], RLENGTH-2,2 )
                  line[-2]=substr( line[-2], 1, RLENGTH-3 ) new[old] \
                           substr( line[-2], RLENGTH ) } }
     NR>2 { printf("%s\n",line[-2]) } 
     END { printf("%s\n%s\n",line[-1],line[0]) }' file.in
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