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I have an NSDictionary and I am trying to pull a string out of it. For some reason, the last string seems irretrievable(!?!). In the code below, I retrieve the NSString object for labelString, with no problem at all. But when I try to retrieve the NSString for foo, I always get nil. But I don't see the difference - can you see what I'm doing wrong?

NSDictionary *dict = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                      [NSNumber numberWithInt:CellStyleLabelledStringCell], @"cellStyle",
                      @"name", @"fieldName", 
                      @"Name", @"labelString", 
                      foodItem.name, @"contentString", 
                      @"foo", @"fookey",
                      nil];

NSString *string1 = (NSString *)[dict objectForKey:@"fookey"];
NSString *string2 = (NSString *)[dict objectForKey:@"labelString"];
NSLog(@"[%@][%@]", string1, string2);

The log message looks like this, and backs-up what I'm seeing in the debugger (i.e., string1 is null):

2012-03-17 21:35:03.302 QuickList7[8244:fb03] [(null)][Name]

Truly perplexed. Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

foodItem.name is nil, so -[NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:] stops there, and doesn't add the subsequent objects to the dictionary.

In other words, it's as if you did this:

NSDictionary *dict = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                      [NSNumber numberWithInt:CellStyleLabelledStringCell], @"cellStyle",
                      @"name", @"fieldName", 
                      @"Name", @"labelString", 
                      nil];

This is why you have to be careful with any method that takes nil as an "end of arguments" sentinel.

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Thanks Kurt! That was it. –  Sasha Mar 24 '12 at 0:53
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Kurt's answer is correct, foodItem.name is nil.

To prevent that, you can either always check objects to see if they're nil before adding to a dictionary, or use the following macro to replace all nil items with NSNull objects:

#define n2N(value) (value ? value : [NSNull null])

So using that macro, your code above would look like:

NSDictionary *dict = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                  [NSNumber numberWithInt:CellStyleLabelledStringCell], @"cellStyle",
                  @"name", @"fieldName", 
                  @"Name", @"labelString", 
                  n2N(foodItem.name), @"contentString", 
                  @"foo", @"fookey",
                  nil];

Also, there's no need to typecast the result of objectForKey: to NSString since that method returns id.

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I like the macro idea, that's slick. Thanks! –  Sasha Mar 24 '12 at 0:54
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