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I am using the AdvetureWorks database. Here is what I would like to do: Give me the Last Name, First Name, company name and list me all the addresses for customer Virginia Miller, include address type, address, city and state. You need to join 3 tables together and filter the results. You should only get 2 rows. This is what I have so far...

Select
SalesLT.Customer.LastName,
SalesLT.Customer.FirstName,
SalesLT.Customer.CompanyName,
CustomerAddress.AddressType,
SalesLT.Address.AddressLine1,
SalesLT.Address.City,
SalesLT.Address.StateProvince

From SalesLT.Customer C, SalesLT.CustomerAddress CA, SalesLT.Address A


 join SalesLT.CustomerAddress

on SalesLT.Address.AddressID=SalesLT.CustomerAddress.AddressID


join SalesLT.Customer
on SalesLT.CustomerAddress.CustomerID=SalesLT.Customer.CustomerID

join SalesLT.Address
on SalesLT.CustomerAddress.AddressID=SalesLT.Address.AddressID

Where SalesLT.Customer.FirstName = 'Virginia'

Yeah I am new and not understanding joins very well. Any nudges in the correct direction are much appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
Your "From" line should only have one table listed. The "join" lines are the ones that tell SQL the additional tables you want information from. So what exactly is the issue you're having? You explained what you want, but not what you tried or what error or problem you're having. – George Clingerman Mar 18 '12 at 3:15
    
Sorry, I am getting too many rows back, I am only to get 2 results from the query. I am having a horrid time with this and am trying to make sense. – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:21
    
The query looks correct with the rows listed such as all that is under Select. I want that From the way it is? To show what I need in the query? Is this where the joining tables works? Sorry I am very confused but do thank you for helping me. – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:24
    
From your original statement it sounds like you were supposed to get only rows for Virginia Miller but if you look at your query you're only filtering on the first name of "Viriginia" so that means you'll at the very least be getting back every singled customer who's first name is Virginia and all their associated data. So you'll definitely want to add in an additional filter to restrict the customer's last name value as well. – George Clingerman Mar 18 '12 at 3:25
    
Ok can do that. Right now I am getting thousands of Virginia Miller! – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The point of a select statement is to get some data back in a specific way. This takes roughly the following form:

select <columns>
from <table/group of tables joined together/sub-query/tvf etc.>
where <condition>

1 - Now, the bit you've having the problem with seems to be the middle bit - we'll do that first.

You've got three tables which contain the data you want back in:

SalesLT.Customer 
SalesLT.CustomerAddress 
SalesLT.Address

And you want to join them together on the columns where the data relate to each other, in this case CustomerID. The inner join statement takes the following form (choosing inner join since all entries have a match in the other tables!):

table1 inner join table2 on table1.columnname = table2.columnname

and if we match up your example to this syntax, we get this:

SalesLT.CustomerAddress INNER JOIN
                      SalesLT.Customer ON SalesLT.CustomerAddress.CustomerID = SalesLT.Customer.CustomerID INNER JOIN
                      SalesLT.Address ON SalesLT.CustomerAddress.AddressID = SalesLT.Address.AddressID

Now the rest of the select statement sees this query as one big "collection" of data, almost as if it was one table - only each column is pre-fixed by the table name. Where you reference one elsewhere in the statement it isn't always necessary to include the fully qualified name (as it can guess as long as there isn't more than one column with the same name in the result set).

2 - The filtering where clause you seem to have got the hang of, but you only seem to be filtering on first name, despite your initial requirements. Adding an additional one is easy:

WHERE     (SalesLT.Customer.FirstName = 'Virginia') AND (SalesLT.Customer.LastName = N'Miller')

3 - Finally there is the small matter of what you want back - this you already had correct.

Combining what we've done together, you get the following query:

SELECT     SalesLT.Customer.LastName, SalesLT.Customer.FirstName, SalesLT.Customer.CompanyName, SalesLT.CustomerAddress.AddressType, 
                      SalesLT.Address.AddressLine1, SalesLT.Address.City, SalesLT.Address.StateProvince
FROM         SalesLT.CustomerAddress INNER JOIN
                      SalesLT.Customer ON SalesLT.CustomerAddress.CustomerID = SalesLT.Customer.CustomerID INNER JOIN
                      SalesLT.Address ON SalesLT.CustomerAddress.AddressID = SalesLT.Address.AddressID
WHERE     (SalesLT.Customer.FirstName = 'Virginia') AND (SalesLT.Customer.LastName = N'Miller')
share|improve this answer
    
THANK YOU!!!!!! This shows the two rows asked for!! – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:52
    
Sorry I keep hitting keys that send before I am done typing! Now I will look back over this and really see what I was missing. Hugs to you and everyone for the awesome help!!! – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:53
    
I thought the explanation along with the answer might help you understand it better! – Bridge Mar 18 '12 at 3:56
    
Wonderful! I am new to this site but I would like to help back too, with badges or something? – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 4:09
    
For starters mark @Bridge as the correct answer. That will be a help to people looking for un-answered question, for people looking for answers to similar questions and to show your appreciation for Bridge's answer. :) – George Clingerman Mar 18 '12 at 4:12

I believe the following should fix your issue.

USE SalesLT

SELECT
    c.LastName,
    c.FirstName,
    c.CompanyName,
    ca.AddressType,
    a.AddressLine1,
    a.City,
    a.StateProvince

FROM
    Customer c

JOIN 
    CustomerAddress ca
    ON c.CustomerID=ca.CustomerID

JOIN 
    Address a
    ON ca.AddressID=a.AddressID

WHERE 
    c.FirstName = 'Virginia'
    AND c.LastName = 'Miller'

When construction a SQL Query, I find it best to start with just selecting the data I want from my primary table. So in the case of this query you're looking for information about a particular customer (in this example you've given it's Virginia Miller). So just getting information about that customer the query would look something like this.

USE SalesLT

SELECT
    c.LastName,
    c.FirstName

FROM
    Customer c

WHERE
    c.FirstName = 'Virginia' 
    AND c.LastName = 'Miller'

So what you've done there is started by indicated which database you're going to be using (that's the USE SalesLT line). That will help with the typing so you don't have to add it before each table name.

Next you're selecting the column names you're interested in (LastName and FirstName). They have the "c." in front of them to specify the nickname or "alias" of the table we're saying that SQL can find that data in.

In the "FROM" line you can see you're telling SQL to look in the Customer table and that you're going to give that table the alias of "c" so that you can quickly reference it and make it clear which columns belong to which tables in your query.

Now that you're getting the data back for Virginia Miller lets look at the next piece. You want an Address for Virginia so you're going to need some way to associate address data with the customer data.

Luckily the AdventureWorks database makes that pretty easy to do because they have the CustomerAddress "join" table. A table like that is designed to simple link records between two tables with some type of ID columns. In this case it links a CustomerID (which is a column in the Customer table) and an AddressID (which is a column in the Address table) so that we can figure out the addresses a particular customer might have.

So now we know we're going to need data from CustomerAddress so we should add that next part into our query.

USE SalesLT

SELECT
    c.LastName,
    c.FirstName,
    c.CompanyName,
    ca.AddressType

FROM
    Customer c

JOIN 
    CustomerAddress ca
    ON c.CustomerID=ca.CustomerID  

WHERE
        c.FirstName = 'Virginia' 
        AND c.LastName = 'Miller'

The new pieces in the above code are the addition of selecting AddressType from the CustomerAddress table and then telling SQL how the Customer table and the CustomerAddress table are related. It can join records between them because the CustomerID in the Customer table is equal to the Customer ID in the CustomerAddress table (JOIN CustomerAddress ca ON c.CustomerID = ca.CustomerID). The "ca" is the nickname or alias we gave the CustomerAddress table so we you use that to reference it everywhere else in the query.

Now that we've got that part of the query working, we're ready for the final stage getting the actual address information.

USE SalesLT

SELECT
    c.LastName,
    c.FirstName,
    c.CompanyName,
    ca.AddressType

FROM
    Customer c

JOIN 
    CustomerAddress ca
    ON c.CustomerID = ca.CustomerID  

JOIN
    Address a
    ON a.AddressID = ca.AddressID

WHERE
        c.FirstName = 'Virginia' 
        AND c.LastName = 'Miller'

That last step just added the additional information of how the Address table is related to the CustomerAddress table. Basically the AddressID column in CustomerAddress is equal to AddressID column in Address.

And now we're back to the original query with all the information we want, the tables SQL can find that data in and the relationships that we defined between the tables.

Tackling a problem step by step is usually a good way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you I will try and get back. This is a great site. – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:37
    
Everything has a red line under it and I get this error... – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:39
    
Msg 208, Level 16, State 1, Line 1 Invalid object name 'Customer'. – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:39
    
If you add back in the SalesLT before your table names does that message go away? So change FROM Customer c to FROM SalesLT.Customer c – George Clingerman Mar 18 '12 at 3:41
    
That is because you haven't selected a DB to use, my answer starts with USE SalesLT – LJ Wilson Mar 18 '12 at 3:43

I don't have the Adventure DB installed, so I don't know the relationships. Assuming the relationships you mentioned are valid, this should work:

USE SalesLT

SELECT
c.LastName,
c.FirstName,
c.CompanyName,
ca.AddressType,
a.AddressLine1,
a.City,
a.StateProvince,
FROM Customer C
INNER JOIN CustomerAddress ca ON ca.CustomerID = c.CustomerID
LEFT JOIN Address a ON a.AddressID = ca.AddressID
WHERE c.FirstName = 'Virginia'

Notes - I used LEFT JOIN on Address because I didn't know if there could be a Customer record with no Address record. In cases where this is possible and you still want to include records for customers even with no addresses, use LEFT JOIN's and COALESCE to identity NULL records.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh my! Thank you, I will try this. I am just so new this is very confusing but I am practicing! – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:30
    
Sadly this came back with many red lines and an error. I have no clue what COALESCE is. – SQL newbie Mar 18 '12 at 3:34
    
COALESCE is a highly use statement. It simply takes the first non-NULL value, so COALESCE(a.AddressLine1, a.AddressLine2, c.SomeOtherField, 'All These Fields Are NULL') will take the first non-null value or output All These Fields Are NULL. You can take the COALESCE away if you want, I usually throw them in there for LEFT JOINS so I can dictate what gets returned in the event of a NULL field value. – LJ Wilson Mar 18 '12 at 3:42
    
You didn't mention what the error you are getting is BTW – LJ Wilson Mar 18 '12 at 3:42
    
Just fixed the SQL to take the COALESCE out – LJ Wilson Mar 18 '12 at 3:44

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