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I found the following code in a book "Mathematics for Game Programmers" by Christopher Ttremblay. it looks like c++, and he does make a bunch of references to performance comparisons to the stllib the code given is as thus:

float Exp2(float X)
{
    float Result, Square, IntPow;
    if (X < 0) {
        const unsigned long IntVal = *(unsigned long *)&X & 0x7FFFFFFF;
        const unsigned long Int = (IntVal >> 23) - 127;
        if ((long)Int > 0) {
            *(unsigned long *)&IntPow = ((((IntVal & 0x007FFFFF) |
                0x00800000) >> (23 - Int)) + 127 + 1) << 23;
            *(unsigned long *)&X = (((IntVal << Int) & 0x007FFFFF)
                | 0x3F800000);
            X = 2.0f - X;
        } else {
            IntPow = 2.0f;
            X++;
        }
        Result = X0CoEff + Square * X1CoEff;
        Square *= X; // The 2 last lines are repeated for every coeff.
        Result += Square * XiCoEff;
        ...
        return Result / IntPow;
    } else {
        const unsigned long IntVal = *(unsigned long *)&X;
        const unsigned long Int = (IntVal >> 23) - 127;
        if ((long)Int > 0) {
            *(unsigned long *)&IntPow = ((((IntVal & 0x007FFFFF) |
                0x00800000) >> (23 - Int)) + 127) << 23;
            *(unsigned long *)&X = (((IntVal << Int) & 0x007FFFFF)
                | 0x3F800000);
            X—;
        } else
            IntPow = 1.0f;
        Square = X;
        Result = X0CoEff + Square * X1CoEff;
        Square *= X; // The 2 last lines are repeated for every coeff.
        Result += Square * XiCoEff;
        ...
        return Result * IntPow;
    }
}

float log2(float X)
{
    float Result, Square;
    Result = (float)((*(unsigned long *)&X) >> 23) - 127 + x0CoEff;
    *(unsigned long *)&X = (*(unsigned long *)&X & 0x007FFFFF) | 0x3F800000;
    Square = X;
    Result += Square * XiCoEff;
    Square *= X; // The 2 last lines are repeated for every coeff.
    ...
    return Result;
}

the thing is I never actually learned bit operations (which I think is what is going on here, and if not I still never dealt with hex in my coding assignments). if someone could go through and maybe help by either commenting, or translating this to higher level c/c++ for understanding.

the book explains that these are supposed to be optimized versions of the functions compared to stllib, but as you can see the code is not very well commented (these lines where copied character for character)

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closed as too localized by Michael Petrotta, Andrew Marshall, Mitch Wheat, In silico, Bo Persson Mar 18 '12 at 4:37

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What do you mean? It's already high level! :P –  scientiaesthete Mar 18 '12 at 4:22
    
@scientiaesthete ok maybe high-level was the wrong term, but what I mean is more along the lines of not working with the bits specifically, but what is going on with the values held by those bits. –  gardian06 Mar 18 '12 at 4:25
    
It's a bunch of arithmetic magic. What Oleksi said. –  scientiaesthete Mar 18 '12 at 4:29
    
This is not something to learn if you're not familiar with bit operations. That's like trying to understand the design of a suspension bridge if you've never worked with steel before. You need to crawl before you try to run a marathon. –  David Schwartz Mar 18 '12 at 4:34
    
This question should be reopened. The intricacies of bit shuffling are irrelevant here. The book is obsolete as processors become ever more sensitive to such hackery. Moving between FP and int registers is slow and getting slower, and there may be instructions to accelerate this operation. The answer is to check that performance really increases before delving into IEEE 754 formats. –  Potatoswatter Mar 18 '12 at 5:37
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1 Answer 1

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You don't really need to understand what they're doing. If you want, you can google bitshift operators in C and understand what the operators are doing, but that probably won't help you here to understand the code. Really, the code just contains very tricky ways to do thing very very fast.

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