Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We were given a simple task to come up with the most efficient way we can to sum all the numbers between a start and end point ('from' and 'to') using recursion and iteration respectively, without using the obvious formula which would be O(1).

There is no application for this, I am simply curious and challenged to see if my solution can be improved / polished more than it already is:

/* recursion */
unsigned int sum1(unsigned int from, unsigned int to) {
    if (to - from < 2)
        return from + (from == to ? 0 : to);
    else
        return from + to + sum1(from + 1, to - 1);
}

/* iteration */
unsigned int sum2(unsigned int from, unsigned int to) {
    int p = to - from;
    if (p == 0) return from;
    int i, s, n = p / 2;
    if (p % 2 == 0) s = n + from;
    else {
        s = 0;
        n++;
    }
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        s += from++ + to--;
    }
    return s;
}
share|improve this question
7  
How stupid kind of task this is! Like "Make a sandwich, but you can't use a knife, only a sword, and grow your own cow, and use its milk to put butter on the bread"... –  user529758 Mar 18 '12 at 5:24
2  
Carbonic Acid, why hate on trying to get a class to think the way that deriving other useful algorithms would require you to think? It's just a simple exercise to practice the concept. –  paranoid-android Mar 18 '12 at 5:29
2  
@AlexReynolds, it's not a duplicate at all, as the other question is open to the use of the Euclidean algorithm. –  paranoid-android Mar 18 '12 at 5:33
3  
how are you defining efficiency here? –  mfrankli Mar 18 '12 at 5:49
3  
@user112358132134 I don't think he is doing that. He made an attempt. Now he simply wants feedback and suggestions on how his approach can be improved. I don't see anything wrong with that. –  torrential coding Mar 18 '12 at 7:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I tried improving the iterative version:

unsigned int sum2_improved(unsigned int from, unsigned int to) {
    int p = to - from;
    if (p == 0) return from;
    int x = to + from;
    int s = 0;
    int i;
    for (i = p >> 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
        s += x;
    }
    s += (p % 2 == 0) ? x >> 1 : x;
    return s;
}

I tested your version with:

for (i = 0; i < 9999999; i++) sum2(1,999);

This is what I see:

$ time ./addm
real    0m18.315s
user    0m18.220s
sys     0m0.015s

I tried my implementation with the same number of loops. Here's how the improved function performed:

$ time ./addm
real    0m14.196s
user    0m14.070s
sys     0m0.015s

UPDATE

In my implementation x = to + from is the sum of the first and the last number in the sequence. If you consider any consecutive sequence of integers, and sum the first and last, the second and the penultimate, and so on ... all these sum up to the same value. For example, in (1 ... 6), 1 + 6 = 2 + 5 = 3 + 4 = 7. However, with a sequence containing odd number of elements, you are left with the middle number which you will then have to add to the cumulative sum (that's what the assignment following the for loop was doing.

Also, note that this is still O(n). I realized after I initially posted my answer that my approach can actually be done in constant time. Here's the updated code:

unsigned int sum0(unsigned int from, unsigned int to) {
    int p = to - from;
    if (p == 0) return from;
    int x = to + from;
    int s = 0;

    s += (x * (p >> 1));

    s += (p % 2 == 0) ? x >> 1 : x;

    return s;
}

I ran this with the same number of loops as the earlier tests. Here's what I saw:

$ time ./addm

real    0m0.158s
user    0m0.093s
sys     0m0.047s

I'm not sure if this can be considered a variation of the formula for your purposes. In any case, it was an interesting exercise for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay it's clear that this is an improvement, and it's intensely interesting. Now to figure out what's going on here. :P Thanks. –  paranoid-android Mar 18 '12 at 8:37
    
Could you explain how you came to this solution? I'm finding it hard to find the logic behind your use of x. –  paranoid-android Mar 18 '12 at 8:43
    
@paranoid-android Answer edited for elaboration. –  torrential coding Mar 18 '12 at 9:15
    
Makes a lot more sense now, however if you look carefully, your constant time solution is simply an implementation of the Euclidean algorithm and even though it's spot on, it's definitely closer to a formula than an iteration. I'll work on your initial answer. Thanks again. :) –  paranoid-android Mar 18 '12 at 9:33
    
@paranoid-android No problem. I had a feeling it was Euclidean-ish. The initial implementation was doing the same thing but looping through about half the sequence to do that, which obviously wasn't necessary as seen in the update. –  torrential coding Mar 18 '12 at 9:42

Split the range (from zero to the upper limit n) in a lower and an upper half. For each value in the lower half there's a value in the upper half that's n/2 larger; there are n/2 of them, so the sum of the upper half is the sum of the lower half + (n/2)^2.

In Python that would be:

def sum1(lower, upper):
    if upper <= 0: 
        return 0
    m, r = divmod(upper, 2)
    return sum1(0, m) * 2 + m * m + r * upper - sum1(0, lower - 1)
share|improve this answer

I am not going to write the code for it, but this is the kind of thing that would directly scale with the number of cores you have working on the task.

Dividing the range into tasks and starting a thread to sum each subsection of the range would divide the time required for whatever implementation you choose by the number of cores (give or take).

You could also use SIMD extensions to facilitate the addition (vector addition) by writing out the data in the memory before hand. Taking it to another extreme, you could actually use the GPU to calculate the addition of subranges (but you'd have to have a big enough range to make it worth the overhead), making it stupid fast; as this question is as simple as you can get with no dependencies whatsoever between the instructions.

share|improve this answer

You can use a segment tree to get the sum on the segement from i to j. This structure has O(log n) lookup time.

share|improve this answer
    
Plus the time needed to build it –  BlackBear Mar 18 '12 at 21:37

The function:

long sum(long lower, long upper) {
    long s = 0;
    s = ((upper * (upper + 1)) - (lower - 1) * (lower))/2;
    return s;
}

called with parameters: (1,9999999) returns 49999995000000 which agrees with summation formula n(n+1)/2 and runs with the following profile on a core duo:

real    0m0.005s
user    0m0.002s
sys     0m0.003s

It might be worth checking your functions, I can't see them returning this result - the mathematical option is a far superior solution ;)

share|improve this answer
    
That would be because of integer overflow, I believe. Note that you're using long values. –  paranoid-android Mar 20 '12 at 6:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.