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I'm building a mobile application that polls the db every 10 seconds for open jobs ($.getJSON). The query result can be quite heavy (around 50kb JSON) so I'm looking for ways to lighten it up. I assume there is a way to retrieve only changes from the db, but I can't wrap my head around it.

Currently, in the PHP part I simply do a SELECT * FROM table WHERE status = 'open'. Jobs will stay open for around 5 minutes, so during that time I uselessly get a lot of data that I already have. What I'd need to retrieve instead would be just the new jobs (added since my last query) and probably those jobs that meanwhile got closed, so that I can remove them from the list.

Is there any practical way to perform this? Maybe on the PHP side?

Thanks!

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You could add a LastChangeTime column and query only jobs that have been updated after your last request. Just be careful with physically deleting records from the table, since then the client will never see that they are gone. –  DCoder Mar 18 '12 at 7:21

1 Answer 1

It's a bit difficult to tell what would be best without knowing your table schema. If many users will be doing that polling I would recommend you do the filtering in the client. I mean, keep track of each open job you get from the query and filter them out from the query if the poll time associated with that job is less than 5 minutes. Once the poll time associated with that job is more than 5 minutes old ask for it again.

For example, if you query the server and get jobs 1, 2 and 3 opened, associate a time value for each (it will be the same).

The next time you query the server (10 seconds later in this case) make sure you filter out those jobs that are less than 5 minutes old:

select * from table
where status = 'open' and jobid not in (1, 2, 3)

Once the 5 minutes pass, you should remove those job ids from the not in clause.

Note this solution would leave the work to the client and won't need any database schema modification.

Edit:

Interesting, but the job's open time is on average 5 minutes, usually between 1 and 8 minutes. – chris

The algorithm still applies. You will have to choose an appropriate timeout. If you choose 1 minute then the client will get more frequently unneeded data (but will be aware of the state change sooner). If you choose 8 minutes then the cliente will get less frequently unneeded data (but will be aware of a state change at most 8 minutes later). You will have to choose an appropriate timeout based on the software requirements. It is a tradeoff, as everything in computing.

My opinion: It is a mobile application: don't download 50kb each 10 seconds. Is the application used to tell me when a restaurant is now 'open'? If that is the case, then it's ok if you have an 8 minute delay. However, If the jobs are sensors of a nuclear reactor, then a 1 minute delay might seem a lot :)

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Interesting, but the job's open time is on average 5 minutes, usually between 1 and 8 minutes. –  chris Mar 18 '12 at 9:36
    
I answered to your comment in the answer itself –  Mosty Mostacho Mar 18 '12 at 14:56

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