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I am getting these errors:

'Map' conflicts with the declaration 'COServer.Map'

A local variable named 'Map' cannot be declared in this scope because it would give a different meaning to 'Map', which is already used in a 'parent or current' scope to denote something else

Here is my code:

foreach (int[] RevP in Map.RevPoints)
{
    if (RevP[0] == (int)(Client.Char.Map))
    {
        Client.Char.Map = (Map.Maps)(RevP[1]);
        Client.Char.CurrentLoc = new Location(RevP[2], RevP[3]);
        Client.Char.PreviousLoc = new Location(RevP[2], RevP[3]);
        break;
    }
}

foreach (int[][][] Map in Database.Maps)
{
    if (Map[1][0][0] == (int)(Client.Char.Map))
    {
        foreach (int[] Chars in Map[2])
        {
            if (Chars[0] == 0)
            {
                Chars[0] = Client.Char.CharID;
                Chars[1] = Client.Char.CurrentLoc.X;
                Chars[2] = Client.Char.CurrentLoc.Y;
                break;
            }
        }
        break;
    }
}
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1  
Also, it is recommended to use camelCaseNames for local variables which also reduces the chance for collisions with e.g. type names (which should be PascalCased) and it makes the code easier to read for other developers (who stick to this convention). –  Andre Loker Mar 18 '12 at 7:23

3 Answers 3

C# does not allow the same "simple name" to be used in two inconsistent ways in blocks which overlap, because doing so makes for confusing code that cannot easily be understood or refactored. Here's a simplified version of your code which demonstrates the issue:

class Map
{
   public static int[] RevPoints = { };
}
class P
{
    void Main()
    {
        int[] maps = { };
        // Here the simple name Map means the type:
        foreach (int i in Map.RevPoints) {}
        // Here the simple name Map means the loop variable:
        foreach (int Map in maps) {}
    } 
}

Don't do that; it is very confusing. The reader of your code should reasonably be able to see the identifier "Map" and have it mean the same thing throughout the block in which it is first used.

The best choice here is to rename the local. Standard practice is to name locals to begin with a lowercase letter anyways.

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It's a naming conflict betwen different instances of the different type you have in this code. I presume it'a variable in foreach stattement. Just rename it and you done.

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What you don't see in your example is the using-statements at the top. What you are having is a namespace conflict.

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