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Popular software developers and companies (Joel Spolsky, Fog Creek software) tend to use wchar_t for Unicode character storage when writing C or C++ code. When and how should one use char and wchar_t in respect to good coding practices?

I am particularly interested in POSIX compliance when writing software that leverages Unicode.

When using wchar_t, you can look up characters in an array of wide characters on a per-character or per-array-element basis:

/* C code fragment */
const wchar_t *overlord = L"ov€rlord";
if (overlord[2] == L'€')
    wprintf(L"Character comparison on a per-character basis.\n");

How can you compare unicode bytes (or characters) when using char?

So far my preferred way of comparing strings and characters of type char in C often looks like this:

/* C code fragment */
const char *mail[] = { "ov€rlord@masters.lt", "ov€rlord@masters.lt" };
if (mail[0][2] == mail[1][2] && mail[0][3] == mail[1][3] && mail[0][3] == mail[1][3])
    printf("%s\n%zu", *mail, strlen(*mail));

This method scans for the byte equivalent of a unicode character. The Unicode Euro symbol takes up 3 bytes. Therefore one needs to compare three char array bytes to know if the Unicode characters match. Often you need to know the size of the character or string you want to compare and the bits it produces for the solution to work. This does not look like a good way of handling Unicode at all. Is there a better way of comparing strings and character elements of type char?

In addition, when using wchar_t, how can you scan the file contents to an array? The function fread does not seem to produce valid results.

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9  
Unicode in C++: don't use wchar_t, use a proper Unicode library. –  Cat Plus Plus Mar 18 '12 at 10:35
3  
tend to use wchar_t for Unicode character encoding. No; they use it for Unicode character storage, and there is a big difference. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 18 '12 at 10:46
2  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Unfortunately, the C/C++ standards do not require wchar_t to be capable of storing Unicode characters, and do not specify how you would figure out the encoding if it does store Unicode characters. –  Dietrich Epp Mar 18 '12 at 12:25
4  
The reason Joel Spolsky can use wchar_t is because he's not writing portable code and not targeting POSIX: he's assuming that wchar_t is UCS-2, which is how it works with "Visual Basic, COM, and Windows NT/2000/XP." Not only is UCS-2 obsolete, the wchar_t type is nearly useless on POSIX systems. Few libraries use it, so the only thing you'll ever do with wchar_t is turn it into something else (probably UTF-16 or UTF-8). You can't manipulate it easily because you can't portably assume how it's encoded. It's like some big joke the standards committees perpetrated. –  Dietrich Epp Mar 18 '12 at 12:33
3  
@DietrichEpp: A joke indeed. wchar_t is essentially a second-class citizen. For example, see stackoverflow.com/questions/3693479/… –  jamesdlin Mar 18 '12 at 13:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you know that you're dealing with unicode, neither char nor wchar_t are appropriate as their sizes are compiler/platform-defined. For example, wchar_t is 2 bytes on Windows (MSVC), but 4 bytes on Linux (GCC). The C11 and C++11 standards have been a bit more rigorous, and define two new character types (char16_t and char32_t) with associated literal prefixes for creating UTF-{8, 16, 32} strings.

If you need to store and manipulate unicode characters, you should use a library that is designed for the job, as neither the pre-C11 nor pre-C++11 language standards have been written with unicode in mind. There are a few to choose from, but ICU is quite popular (and supports C, C++, and Java).

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3  
Even C++11 is quite light on the unicode stuff. Beyond mandating a few types and standard conversions between utf8/16/32 you won't find anything like collation, comparison, normalization, etc. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Mar 18 '12 at 11:06
    
Just as an addition, I think C11 here tries to be in sync with C++1 and introduces the same new char??_t types. –  Jens Gustedt Mar 18 '12 at 11:18
    
Yes, C11 is in sync with C++11 for these types/literals. –  一二三 Mar 18 '12 at 11:22

I am particularly interested in POSIX compliance when writing software that leverages Unicode.

In this case, you'll probably want to use UTF-8 (with char) as your preferred Unicode string type. POSIX doesn't have a lot of functions for working with wchar_t — that's mostly a Windows thing.

This method scans for the byte equivalent of a unicode character. The Unicode Euro symbol € takes up 3 bytes. Therefore one needs to compare three char array bytes to know if the Unicode characters match. Often you need to know the size of the character or string you want to compare and the bits it produces for the solution to work.

No, you don't. You just compare the bytes. Iff the bytes match, the strings match. strcmp works just as well with UTF-8 as it does with any other encoding.

Unless you want something like a case-insensitive or accent-insensitive comparison, in which case you'll need a proper Unicode library.

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You should never-ever compare bytes, or even code points, to decide if strings are equal. That's because of a lot of strings can be identical from user perspective without being identical from code point perspective.

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