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I generally see examples of initialisation vs assignment like this:

int funct1(void)
{int a = 5; /*initialization*/
a = 6;}     /*assignment*/

Obviously something left as garbage or undefined somehow is uninitialized.

But could some one please define if initialization is reserved for definition statements and/or whether assignments can be called initialisation?

int funct2(void)
{int b;     
b = 5;}     /*assignment, initialization or both??*/

Is there much of a technical reason why we can't say int b is initialised to garbage (from the compilers point of view)?

Also if possible could this be compared with initializing and assinging on non-primitive data types.

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3  
A garbage variable? –  Mr Lister Mar 18 '12 at 11:47
    
int b; only contains garbage that's all I meant. –  sabgenton Mar 18 '12 at 12:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As far as the language standard is concerned, only statements of the form int a = 5; are initialisation. Everything of the form b = 5; is an assignment.

The same is true of non-primitive types.

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1  
Yes this make sense with statement's I hear like "you CANT assign to a const variable, whereas you CAN initialize it." –  sabgenton Mar 18 '12 at 11:52
    
could you change int b = 5 to int a = 5 so it matches my question (unless it detracts from what your saying)? –  sabgenton Mar 18 '12 at 12:00
    
@sabgenton: Sure, –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 18 '12 at 12:00
    
Thanks :), so ... do we say b = 5 makes b assigned but not initialized lol? –  sabgenton Mar 18 '12 at 12:13
    
@sabgenton: Yes. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 18 '12 at 12:15

I'll resurrect this thread to add an important point of view, since the puzzlement about terminology by the OP is understandable. As @OliCharlesworth pointed out (and he's perfectly right about that) as far as the C language standard is concerned initialization and assignment are two completely different things. For example (assuming local scope):

int n = 1;    // definition, declaration and **initialization**
int k;        // just definition + declaration, but no initialization
n = 12;       // assignment of a previously initialized variable
k = 42;       // assignment of a previously UNinitialized variable

The problem is that many books that teach programming aren't so picky about terminology, so they call "initialization" any "operation" that gives a variable its first meaningful value. So, in the example above, n = 12 wouldn't be an initialization, whereas k = 42 would. Of course this terminology is vague, imprecise and may be misleading (although it is used too often, especially by teachers when introducing programming to newbies). As a simple example of such an ambiguity let's recast the previous example taking global scope into account:

// global scope
int n = 1;    // definition, declaration and **initialization**
int k;        // definition, declaration and **implicit initialization to 0**

int main(void)
{
    n = 12;       // assignment of a previously initialized variable
    k = 42;       // assignment of a previously initialized variable

   // ... other code ...
}

What would you say about the assignments in main? The first is clearly only an assignment, but is it the second an initialization, according to the vague, generic terminology? Is the default value 0 given to k its first "meaningful" value or not?

Moreover a variable is commonly said to be uninitialized if no initialization or assignment has been applied to it. Given:

int x; 
x = 42; 

one would commonly say that x is uninitialized before the assignment, but not after it. The terms assignment and initializer are defined syntactically, but terms like "initialization" and "uninitialized" are often used to refer to the semantics (in somewhat informal usage). [Thanks to Keith Thompson for this last paragraph].

I dislike this vague terminology, but one should be aware that it is used and, alas, not too rare.

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1  
And a variable is commonly said to be uninitialized if no initialization or assignment has been applied to it. Given: int x; x = 42; one would commonly say that x is uninitialized before the assignment but not after it. The terms assignment and initializer are defined syntactically, but terms like "initialization" and "uninitialized" are often used to refer to the semantics (in somewhat informal usage). –  Keith Thompson Sep 12 '13 at 19:51
    
@KeithThompson Thanks for the useful addition! It really completes the picture I wanted to convey! –  Lorenzo Donati Sep 12 '13 at 19:54
    
Feel free to incorporate it into your answer. –  Keith Thompson Sep 12 '13 at 20:06
    
@KeithThompson I'll do that. Thanks! –  Lorenzo Donati Sep 12 '13 at 20:06
    
I guess the right thing to do is up vote you while keeping the tick with Oli Charlesworth. :D –  sabgenton Nov 4 '13 at 7:50

And to "Is there much of a technical reason why we can't say int b is initialised to garbage", well, if you don't put any value into a memory location, it's not "initialisation". From the compiler's point of view, no machine language instruction is generated to write to the location, so nothing happens.

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I can still display the random garbage value in b, is there any thing the compiler will do or warn me about when I'm dealing with b? (as it knows no machine language instruction has been generated to write to the location as you have pointed out) –  sabgenton Mar 18 '12 at 12:30
    
No, no warnings. It's entirely up to you if you want to do bad things. C++ doesn't hold your hand, the way some other languages I could name do. –  Mr Lister Mar 18 '12 at 13:41
2  
@sabgenton At least if you turn the warning level up, a good compiler will warn you about using uninitialised variables. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 18 '12 at 14:20

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