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I'm trying to quickstart with dynamic shared libraries in D, but I'm having a problem.

I'm building following code with dmd -shared ./testlib.d:

module testlib;

import std.c.stdio;

extern (C) export int hello(int a) {
    printf("Number is %d", a);

    return (a + 1);
}

It builds fine, and works. But when I'm trying to make use of following more D'ish source:

module testlib;

import std.stdio;

extern (C) export int hello(int a) {
    writefln("Number is %d", a);

    return (a + 1);
}

It fails with segmentation fault once I'm trying to call hello. What am I doing wrong?

I'm calling hello using Python:

import ctypes

testlib = ctypes.CDLL('testlib.dylib');

print (testlib.hello(10))

UPD1: Seems that I also cannot use Phobos functions like std.conv.to!(string).

UPD2: There is no such problem on Windows, everything seems to work fine. Mac OS X suffers from this.

UPD3: Possibly, this is connected with GC. I must somehow initialize GC, but core.memory.GC.enable() still fails with segmentation fault.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Solution is simple, yet brilliant:

static import core.runtime;

extern (C) export void init() { // to be called once after loading shared lib
    core.runtime.Runtime.initialize();
}

extern (C) export void done() { // to be called before unloading shared lib
    core.runtime.Runtime.terminate();
}

Possibly, there are ways in Linux and Mac OS X to call these functions automagically, but I'm satisfied with even this.

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1  
Maybe, use RAII instead? so, create new class DRuntime and add your init function to constructor, done - to destructor. So, client just create object of this class - and it makes all job for us. –  Raxillan Mar 18 '12 at 16:06
    
But what should I do if client is not written in D? E.g. how can C core instantiate DRuntime descendant? –  modchan Mar 18 '12 at 16:56
    
If you need explicitly C, what haven't C++ class, new, constructors/destructors support - just use your init/done functions in usual C-style. And you can look at dlang.org/cpp_interface.html, if not yet. –  Raxillan Mar 18 '12 at 18:04

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