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My agility app is binding the following data structure:

[
    {
        "id":"1", 
        "items":[ {"name":"first"}, {"name":"second"} ]
    },
    {
        "id":"2", 
        "items":[ {"name":"third"}, {"name":"fourth"} ]
    }
]

I want to use this data structure to create a nested list:

<ul>
    <li>1
        <ul>
            <li>first</li>
            <li>second</li>
        </ul>
   </li>
   <li>2
        <ul>
            <li>third</li>
            <li>fourth</li>
        <ul>
   </li>
</ul>

But agility.js seems to only handle binding simple, flat objects. Is there a way to accomplish a binding like this in agility.js, and if so what would the item and container templates look like?

share|improve this question

Agility currently doesn't offer binding to dotted variables. Please follow this thread for updates:

http://groups.google.com/group/agilityjs/browse_thread/thread/5524b72dd1d1894c

share|improve this answer

You could use nested agility objects to achieve what you want.

So you have an object to describe the outer list, within that you then have an object that describes the first level children 1 & 2, then you have another agility object definition that describes the grandchildren. Kinda similar to the demo TODO application, but with one more level of complexity. You could take advantage of Agility.js's inheritance and write an Abstract objects containing common functionality that would be shared by the two li objects.

I think this approach is a better code design than having one "god object", that describes the list and its children, and their children, remember you can never have enough objects but an individual class can easily have too many responsibilities.

hope that helps

share|improve this answer
    
hi Gav, the problem here would be with persistence, i.e. how to map the hierarchy of objects to a database backend. with that in mind and to keep things simple it might best to have all properties in a single object – artur Mar 20 '12 at 14:23

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