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I made a simple array that holds 2,000,000 ints for holding all the RGBs and a second array that holds 2,000,000 ints for the amount of times that rgb has been detected. Then I have it loop through all 6,000,000 bytes of a picture like so:

        uint[] colors = new uint[rawImageBytes.Length / 3];
        int[] hits    = new int[rawImageBytes.Length / 3];

        int colorAmount     = 0;
        int totalRepeats    = 0;
        int lastTime        = Environment.TickCount;
        int lastCount       = 0;
        uint currentColor   = 0;
        bool found;

        for (int i = 0; i < rawImageBytes.Length - 3; i += 3)
        {
            if (Environment.TickCount - lastTime > 10000)
            {
                setStatus(((i - lastCount)/10) + " checks per second");
                lastTime = Environment.TickCount;
                lastCount = i;
            }


            currentColor = (uint)((rawImageBytes[i] << 0) | (rawImageBytes[i + 1] << 8) | (rawImageBytes[i + 2] << 16));

            //set it to false to see if pattern exists
            found = false;

            //check all patterns
            for (int k = 0; k < colorAmount; k++)
            {
                //if pattern exists
                if (colors[k] == currentColor)
                {
                    //dont add it and increase the hit instead
                    found = true;
                    hits[k]++;
                }
            }

            //if pattern does not exist, set it
            if (found == false)
            {
                colors[colorAmount] = currentColor;
                hits[colorAmount] = 0;
                colorAmount++;
            }
        }

And my log shows that they speed slows down significantly from the search range increasing

5724 checks per second

5847 checks per second

5959 checks per second

6044 checks per second

6318 checks per second

7096 checks per second

8530 checks per second

10680 checks per second

16233 checks per second

11469 checks per second

How can I make my search more efficient so that it doesn't take 20 minutes?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

First issue I see is that your hits array is ecxessively large. If you assume that one color may be hit more than once, then your hits array must me shorter than your colors array.

Second issue I see is that you don't stop iterating after you found your color in colors array. You should place break; after found = true; statement.

Why you don't like Dictionary< uint,int> type for your hits collection? Your color should be a Key and hits count should be a value:

    uint[] colors = new uint[rawImageBytes.Length / 3];
    Dictionary<uint,int> hits    = new Dictionary<uint,int>();

    int colorAmount     = 0;
    int totalRepeats    = 0;
    int lastTime        = Environment.TickCount;
    int lastCount       = 0;
    uint currentColor   = 0;


    for (int i = 0; i < rawImageBytes.Length - 3; i += 3)
    {
        if (Environment.TickCount - lastTime > 10000)
        {
            setStatus(((i - lastCount)/10) + " checks per second");
            lastTime = Environment.TickCount;
            lastCount = i;
        }


        currentColor = (uint)((rawImageBytes[i] << 0) | (rawImageBytes[i + 1] << 8) | (rawImageBytes[i + 2] << 16));


        if (hits.ContainsKey(currentColor))
        {
            hits[currentColor]++;
        }
        else
        {
            hits.Add(currentColor,1);
        }

    }

And also try enabling optimization instruction for compiler.

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There's a principle that I think is not applied here and that would increase performances. From what I see, your arrays are not sorted and the search is linear. So for every row in your first array, all the rows of your second array are searched.

Here are some things to test: - Sorting the second array (on which you perform the search) - Array.find() instead of looping by yourself

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You could try using a list of color-count pairs (instead of your two arrays), and keep it sorted on the color index. Then use binary-search to find repeated colors. I suspect this will be faster than using a dictionary, but that might be worth trying too(?).

sorting and binary search: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b0zbh7b6.aspx#Y700

dictionary: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xfhwa508.aspx

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1  
Binary search is not especially fast because the branches are hard to predict for the CPU. Don't be surprised if it is much slower than hashing. – usr Mar 18 '12 at 13:08

This looks like a good use-case for parallelization Rather than doing all the counting/etc stuff yourself, lets just let LINQ take care of that

First, lets put your iterator logic into it's own method so you can tweak that separately:

IEnumerable<uint> GetColors(byte[] rawImageBytes) 
{ 
    int lastTime        = Environment.TickCount;
    for (int i = 0; i < rawImageBytes.Length - 3; i += 3)
    {
        if (Environment.TickCount - lastTime > 10000)
        {
           setStatus(((i - lastCount)/10) + " checks per second");
           lastTime = Environment.TickCount;
           lastCount = i;
        }


        currentColor = (uint)((rawImageBytes[i] << 0) | (rawImageBytes[i + 1] << 8) | (rawImageBytes[i + 2] << 16));

        yield return currentColor; 
   }
} 

Now lets rewrite your method a little using PLINQ:

var results = (from color in GetColors(rawImageBytes).AsParallel()
              group by color into g
              select new { Color = g.Key,  Count = g.Count()}).ToList(); 

var uniqueColours = results.Count(); 
var totalHits = results.Select(r=>r.Count()).Sum(); 

(written without a compiler handy, so you might need to tweak it)

See how that goes.

share|improve this answer
    
I've found LINQ to be extremely slow when it comes to sorting. A simple insertion sort was way quicker than LINQ... – Pedery Mar 18 '12 at 13:40
    
Well, I was going to give a solution like @Dos095-russ did, but I figured LINQ would be fast enough. Either way - switching to using Parallel.ForEach over the results and adding to a ConcurrentDictionary<uint, int> is easy enough. – Will Hughes Mar 18 '12 at 14:11

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