Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I’m trying to write a grammar for a language which allows the following expressions:

  1. Function calls of the form f args (note: no parentheses!)
  2. Addition (and more complex expressions but that’s not the point here) of the form a + b

For example:

f 42       => f(42)
42 + b     => (42 + b)
f 42 + b   => f(42 + b)

The grammar is unambiguous (every expression can be parsed in exactly one way) but I don’t know how to write this grammar as a PEG since both productions potentially start with the same token, id. This is my wrong PEG. How can I rewrite it to make it valid?

expression ::= call / addition

call ::= id addition*

addition ::= unary
           ( ('+' unary)
           / ('-' unary) )*

unary ::= primary
        / '(' ( ('+' unary)
              / ('-' unary)
              / expression)
          ')'

primary ::= number / id

number ::= [1-9]+

id ::= [a-z]+

Now, when this grammar tries to parse the input “a + b” it parses “a” as a function call with zero arguments and chokes on “+ b”.

I’ve uploaded a C++ / Boost.Spirit.Qi implementation of the grammar in case anybody wants to play with it.


(Note that unary disambiguates unary operations and additions: In order to call a function with a negative number as an argument, you need to specify parentheses, e.g. f (-1).)

share|improve this question
    
Is PEG a requirement? There are other parsing algorithms which may handle this without massive grammar restructuring. I'm a huge fan of Pratt parsers, which should handle this easily and are reasonably efficent too. –  delnan Mar 18 '12 at 14:50
    
@delnan Since I’m using Boost.Qi, PEGs are a fixed requirement, yes. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 18 '12 at 15:10
    
@delnan By the way, if I was unconstrained by technology I’d use a precedence matrix. That would make it as easy as specifying all the operator precedences, and parsing is technically efficient but I’ve never seen a ready-made implementation of that, and never a mention outside the Dragon Book, and the algorithm pseudocode is hard to understand and I think it contains an error. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 18 '12 at 17:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As proposed in chat you could start out with something like:

expression = addition | simple;

addition = simple >>
    (  ('+' > expression)
     | ('-' > expression)
    );

simple = '(' > expression > ')' | call | unary | number;

call = id >> *expression;

unary = qi::char_("-+") > expression;

// terminals
id = qi::lexeme[+qi::char_("a-z")];
number = qi::double_;

Since then I implemented this in C++ with an AST presentation, so you can get a feel for how this grammar actually build the expression tree by pretty printing it.

All source code is on github: https://gist.github.com/2152518

There are two versions (scroll down to 'Alternative' to read more


Grammar:

template <typename Iterator>
struct mini_grammar : qi::grammar<Iterator, expression_t(), qi::space_type> 
{
    qi::rule<Iterator, std::string(),  qi::space_type> id;
    qi::rule<Iterator, expression_t(), qi::space_type> addition, expression, simple;
    qi::rule<Iterator, number_t(),     qi::space_type> number;
    qi::rule<Iterator, call_t(),       qi::space_type> call;
    qi::rule<Iterator, unary_t(),      qi::space_type> unary;

    mini_grammar() : mini_grammar::base_type(expression) 
    {
        expression = addition | simple;

        addition = simple [ qi::_val = qi::_1 ] >> 
           +(  
               (qi::char_("+-") > simple) [ phx::bind(&append_term, qi::_val, qi::_1, qi::_2) ] 
            );

        simple = '(' > expression > ')' | call | unary | number;

        call = id >> *expression;

        unary = qi::char_("-+") > expression;

        // terminals
        id = qi::lexeme[+qi::char_("a-z")];
        number = qi::double_;
    }
};

The corresponding AST structures are defined quick-and-dirty using the very powerful Boost Variant:

struct addition_t;
struct call_t;
struct unary_t;
typedef double number_t;

typedef boost::variant<
    number_t,
    boost::recursive_wrapper<call_t>,
    boost::recursive_wrapper<unary_t>,
    boost::recursive_wrapper<addition_t>
    > expression_t;

struct addition_t
{
    expression_t lhs;
    char binop;
    expression_t rhs;
};

struct call_t
{
    std::string id;
    std::vector<expression_t> args;
};

struct unary_t
{
    char unop;
    expression_t operand;
};

BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(addition_t, (expression_t, lhs)(char,binop)(expression_t, rhs));
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(call_t,     (std::string, id)(std::vector<expression_t>, args));
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(unary_t,    (char, unop)(expression_t, operand));

In the full code, I've also overloaded operator<< for these structures.


Full Demo

//#define BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <string>

#include <boost/spirit/include/qi.hpp>
#include <boost/spirit/include/phoenix.hpp>
#include <boost/fusion/adapted.hpp>
#include <boost/optional.hpp>

namespace qi = boost::spirit::qi;
namespace phx= boost::phoenix;

struct addition_t;
struct call_t;
struct unary_t;
typedef double number_t;

typedef boost::variant<
    number_t,
    boost::recursive_wrapper<call_t>,
    boost::recursive_wrapper<unary_t>,
    boost::recursive_wrapper<addition_t>
    > expression_t;

struct addition_t
{
    expression_t lhs;
    char binop;
    expression_t rhs;

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const addition_t& a) 
        { return os << "(" << a.lhs << ' ' << a.binop << ' ' << a.rhs << ")"; }
};

struct call_t
{
    std::string id;
    std::vector<expression_t> args;

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const call_t& a)
        { os << a.id << "("; for (auto& e : a.args) os << e << ", "; return os << ")"; }
};

struct unary_t
{
    char unop;
    expression_t operand;

    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const unary_t& a)
        { return os << "(" << a.unop << ' ' << a.operand << ")"; }
};

BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(addition_t, (expression_t, lhs)(char,binop)(expression_t, rhs));
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(call_t,     (std::string, id)(std::vector<expression_t>, args));
BOOST_FUSION_ADAPT_STRUCT(unary_t,    (char, unop)(expression_t, operand));

void append_term(expression_t& lhs, char op, expression_t operand)
{
    lhs = addition_t { lhs, op, operand };
}

template <typename Iterator>
struct mini_grammar : qi::grammar<Iterator, expression_t(), qi::space_type> 
{
    qi::rule<Iterator, std::string(),  qi::space_type> id;
    qi::rule<Iterator, expression_t(), qi::space_type> addition, expression, simple;
    qi::rule<Iterator, number_t(),     qi::space_type> number;
    qi::rule<Iterator, call_t(),       qi::space_type> call;
    qi::rule<Iterator, unary_t(),      qi::space_type> unary;

    mini_grammar() : mini_grammar::base_type(expression) 
    {
        expression = addition | simple;

        addition = simple [ qi::_val = qi::_1 ] >> 
           +(  
               (qi::char_("+-") > simple) [ phx::bind(&append_term, qi::_val, qi::_1, qi::_2) ] 
            );

        simple = '(' > expression > ')' | call | unary | number;

        call = id >> *expression;

        unary = qi::char_("-+") > expression;

        // terminals
        id = qi::lexeme[+qi::char_("a-z")];
        number = qi::double_;

        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(expression);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(call);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(addition);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(simple);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(unary);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(id);
        BOOST_SPIRIT_DEBUG_NODE(number);
    }
};

std::string read_input(std::istream& stream) {
    return std::string(
        std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(stream),
        std::istreambuf_iterator<char>());
}

int main() {
    std::cin.unsetf(std::ios::skipws);
    std::string const code = read_input(std::cin);
    auto begin = code.begin();
    auto end = code.end();

    try {
        mini_grammar<decltype(end)> grammar;
        qi::space_type space;

        std::vector<expression_t> script;
        bool ok = qi::phrase_parse(begin, end, *(grammar > ';'), space, script);

        if (begin!=end)
            std::cerr << "Unparsed: '" << std::string(begin,end) << "'\n";

        std::cout << std::boolalpha << "Success: " << ok << "\n";

        if (ok)
        {
            for (auto& expr : script)
                std::cout << "AST: " << expr << '\n';
        }
    }
    catch (qi::expectation_failure<decltype(end)> const& ex) {
        std::cout << "Failure; parsing stopped after \""
                  << std::string(ex.first, ex.last) << "\"\n";
    }
}

Alternative:

I have an alternative version that build addition_t iteratively instead of recursively, so to say:

struct term_t
{
    char binop;
    expression_t rhs;
};

struct addition_t
{
    expression_t lhs;
    std::vector<term_t> terms;
};

This removes the need to use Phoenix to build the expression:

    addition = simple >> +term;

    term = qi::char_("+-") > simple;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.