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I need a way to make a DIV repeat a certain number of times vertically.

Specs:

Position:absolute
Height:10px
Width:10px
Border-radius:4px
  • I need the DIV to repeat 36 times
  • I need 1px space between each repetition

I could do this by making 36 DIVs, but then I have to specify the position of each, so that would be a ton of markup and CSS.

TIA, Ian

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1  
This cannot be done with pure HTML/CSS. –  MarcinJuraszek Mar 18 '12 at 18:35
    
Either have to do this by hand, JavaScript, or a server-side language like PHP. –  j08691 Mar 18 '12 at 18:37
    
What are you trying to achieve? To repeat a div you'll need some jquery or server side code to repeatedly generate the div. If you're trying to achieve something in particularl we may be able to advise on a better approach –  cusimar9 Mar 18 '12 at 18:38
    
That's the example: jsfiddle.net/LtK3v –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 18:42
    
I need to repeat the green and the blue; the green 36 times and the blue 37. I have to stick with the divs like it is so that I can easily change the background colors/images by editing the CSS. –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 18:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about nest them?

you can nest them with relative positioning or maybe some margin: http://jsfiddle.net/zWbUu/

HTML

div id="container">
    <div class="square">
        <div class="square">
            <div class="square">
                <div class="square">
                    <div class="square">
                        <div class="square"></div>
                    </div>
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

​ CSS:

#container {
    position: absolute;
    top: -21px;
    left: 20px;
}
.square {
    background-color: #666;
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    position: relative;
    top: 21px;
}​

If you need some content int them, you can use a nested absolute positioned div or this trick: http://jsfiddle.net/zWbUu/1/

HTML:

<div id="container">1 (doesn't apear)
    <div class="square">2
        <div class="square">3
            <div class="square">4
                <div class="square">5
                    <div class="square">6
                        <div class="square">7</div>
                    </div>
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

​CSS:

#container {
    position: absolute;
    top: -20px;
    left: 20px;
}
.square {
    background-color: #666;
    width: 20px;
    height: 20px;
    line-height: 20px;
    position: relative;
    top: 1px;
    color: #fff;
    text-align: center;
}​
share|improve this answer
    
That looks good to me; it definitely solves the tons of CSS, but do you know of a way to do it without so much markup? 36 div tags is a lot! Thanks, Ian –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 18:51
    
With HTML and CSS alone, this is not possible. But you can use a server side tech or javascript to create them. I personally recommend the first, since it's more accessible. See DrAgonmoray answer for a PHP example. –  rcdmk Mar 18 '12 at 18:53
    
I guess I'll try your way. I just hate having 109 elements to do this; it seems like I'm going overboard. –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 19:39

As others have said, you cannot do this using pure HTML or CSS. If you wanted to do it with PHP, you could do something like this:

Say that your div has a class called "mydiv." This class should have Position:absolute Height:10px Width:10px Border-radius:4px just like you said. In addition to those, add a 1px top margin.

Your CSS should now look kinda like this:

.mydiv {
    position:absolute;
    height:10px;
    width:10px;
    border-radius:4px;
    margin-top:1px;
}

To make your div repeat, put some code like the following inside your HTML where you want it to go.

<?php
for ($i = 1; $i <= 36; $i++) {
    echo "<div class='mydiv'>your div</div>";
}
?>

Like I said, this uses PHP. If you've never used PHP before, then you should check if your webserver supports it. See this for a bit more info on using PHP inside HTML:

http://www.ntchosting.com/php/php-in-html.html

This code probably isn't perfect but I'm sure you'll be able to work with it.

share|improve this answer
    
I have absolutely no knowledge in PHP and Javascript, plus I am pretty sure that Google Sites (the program I'm using) won't allow Javascript or PHP. I definitely will look into what you said though. Thanks! –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 18:49
    
it probably won't allow PHP but I'm pretty sure it allows Javascript. The problem with JS is that if the person viewing your website doesn't have it enabled they will not see it. It also can be modified and cheated (whereas PHP cannot) –  DrAgonmoray Mar 18 '12 at 18:56
    
OK, I tried it in Jsfiddle, but all it did was remove the div I was trying to repeat. Compare it to this one, where the green on the left is the one I was trying to repeat. –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 18:56
    
OK, I know for a fact that Sites doesn't support Javascript, but I have no idea if it supports embedded PHP. –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 19:02
    
It doesn't even support Javascript? It definitely won't support PHP then. I'm not sure what to tell you. :| –  DrAgonmoray Mar 18 '12 at 19:15

This is not possible with absolute positioning, because as you stated with absolute positioning you must define the coordinates of the objective as it is taken out of the document flow.

You can do this with floats however. Take the following code for example:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
<style type="text/css">
    body{
        background-color:#000;
        padding: 0;
        margin: 0;
    }
    #holder{
        width:15px;
        margin: 30px auto;
        padding: 1px 1px 0 1px;
            clear: both;
    }

    .box{
        width:10px;
        height:10px;
        margin-bottom: 1px;
        background-color: #3F6;
        float:left;
    }

</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="holder">
        <div class="box">
        </div>
        <div class="box">
        </div>
        <div class="box">
        </div>
        <div class="box">
        </div>
        <div class="box">
        </div>
        <div class="box">
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>

By making the holder div less than the width of two box divs you force the next box div to appear on a newline below the previous one without giving it an exact positioning value. Then just give it a margin to add the spacing.

share|improve this answer
    
I can easily do it by using a ton of DIV tags, but I want to avoid that at all costs because it would mean a grand total of 109 DIVs! –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 19:05
    
I think you don't need to use float here, since they already are blocks and falls down the successors. –  rcdmk Mar 18 '12 at 19:48

The only way you can do this with one div would be to create an image of what the current div looks like, with 1px of whitespace. This way, you can create a fixed width/height div that has the background of the image set to repeat. This will give the illusion you want with only one div.

Otherwise, as already stated, you will need x amount of divs to get the repetition you need. This can be easily achieved using jQuery or something similar but if you really only want one div, then the background-image may be the way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
Alright, I guess I was being a bit ambitious here. –  Ian Mar 18 '12 at 19:37

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