Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to count the number of loops in this basic example:

numSt = []
numSti = 0
for i in xrange(0,2):
    for j in xrange(0,2):
        numSti += 1
        numSt.append(numSti)

I get numSti: (1,2,1,2) instead of (1,2,3,4)....

My real code is also very basic, the difference is that "2" is replaced by a integer variable.

My mistake. The code is OK! I then had:

for i in xrange(0,numStY_total): #ordered in rows
    for j in xrange(0,numStX_total):
        numSti += 1
        numSt.append(numSti)
        coordSt.append((i+1,j+1,numSt[j],x[j],y[i],z[0]))

which is why I got 1,2 and 1,2. Instead it should be something like:

        coordSt.append((i+1,j+1,numSt[counter],x[j],y[i],z[0]))
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by sch, ninjagecko, Karoly Horvath, bernie, D.Shawley Mar 18 '12 at 19:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
Could you please post your real code. The code in the question does not produce the output you report. Use the clipboard. –  David Heffernan Mar 18 '12 at 18:56
    
I get the right result with your code, numSt is [1,2,3,4] at the end. –  heinrich5991 Mar 18 '12 at 18:58
    
post code that reproduces the problem or else the question will be closed. –  Karoly Horvath Mar 18 '12 at 19:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I get the correct result:

In [3]: numSt = []

In [4]: numSti = 0

In [5]: for i in xrange(0,2):
...:         for j in xrange(0,2):
...:             numSti += 1
...:             numSt.append(numSti)
...: 

In [6]: numSt
Out[6]: [1, 2, 3, 4]
share|improve this answer

If you add the initializiation at the beginning numSt=[] your code produces the right result: [1,2,3,4].

My real code is also very basic, the difference is that "2" is replaced by a integer variable

that would work too. post code which reproduces the problem. otherwise we are not able to help.

share|improve this answer

You can use enumerate to have a running index in the loop and itertools.product to have all combinations of the iterables.

from itertools import product

numSt = [n for n, tup in enumerate(product(xrange(2), xrange(2)))]

print(numSt)

By the way xrange(0, 2) is the same as xrange(2)

share|improve this answer

Your real code probably does not initialize the numSt variable. it probably exists only within the scope of the second for loop. This would explain this behavior.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.