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I am writing an application in python that solves puzzles. I am searching some text for a combination of characters, if I have a set of characters [abcd], then I need to find sub-strings in the text that contain only the characters abcd, and also must contain at least one occurrence of each character- so that the characters abcd matches dcba or abbcdd, but not acd, bbcd or abced. If use regex [abcd]+ then I will get substrings that do not contain each character

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closed as not a real question by Oded, Carl Norum, bernie, Michael Petrotta, Rafał Rawicki Mar 18 '12 at 20:12

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

6  
You need to add the python tag. You also need to show what things you’ve already tried and explain what didn’t work. This is not a GIMME DA CODE site. –  tchrist Mar 18 '12 at 19:07
    
Can you please give us more details? This is far too vague. –  Austin Henley Mar 18 '12 at 19:24

2 Answers 2

If the string must contain at least abcd, but can contain others, then this would work

(?=.*a)(?=.*b)(?=.*c)(?=.*d)

if, as well they can only contain abcd, then this probably is better

^(?=.*a)(?=.*b)(?=.*c)(?=.*d)[abcd]+$

update

To answer you question, if you are looking for a floating version, this does what you want:

(?=([abcd]{4,}))(?=[bcd]*a)(?=[acd]*b)(?=[abd]*c)(?=[abc]*d)\1

Expanded:

      # At POSition
(?=                # Lookahead
   (                     # Capture grp 1
      [abcd]{4,}            # Get 4 or more (greedy) 'a' or 'b' or 'c' or 'd' characters
   )
)
(?=                # Lookahead, check for 'a' (still at POS) 
   [bcd]*a               # 0 or more [bcd]'s then 'a'
)
(?=                # Lookahead, check for 'b' (still at POS) 
   [acd]*b               # 0 or more [acd]'s then 'b'
)
(?=                # Lookahead, check for 'c' (still at POS) 
   [abd]*c               # 0 or more [abd]'s then 'c'
)
(?=                # Lookahead, check for 'd' (still at POS)
   [abc]*d               # 0 or more [abc]'s then 'd'
)
\1                 # Backref to capt grp 1, consume it

    # Passed test, now at POSition + length of capture group 1

more

You might be able to systematically construct a regex from a search string. I don't know python that well, so here is a sample of how to do it in Perl. Be aware though, that the longer the string is, the longer time it will take to find matches but this should be fairly quick.

use strict;
use warnings;

my $samp  = 'bddaaabcabbad characters abcd matches dcba or abbcdd, but not acd, bbcd or abced';

my $regex = '(?=([abcd]{4,}))(?=[bcd]*a)(?=[acd]*b)(?=[abd]*c)(?=[abc]*d)\1';

while ($samp =~/$regex/xg)
{
    print "Found '$1'\n";
}

# Regex construction
# ------------------------------
my @AryofSearchStrs = (
 'abcd',
 '%^&*',
 'hi( )there',
 '==-yes',
);

for my $search_string (@AryofSearchStrs)
{
   my $str = $search_string;
   while( $str =~ s/(.)(.*)\1/$1$2/g) {}

   my @astr = split '', $str;

   my $rxformed = '(?=([' . quotemeta($str) . ']{' . length($str) . ',}))';
   for (my $i = 0; $i < @astr; $i++)
   {
      $rxformed .=
       '(?=['
       . join( '', map { quotemeta($_) } @astr[0..($i-1), ($i+1)..$#astr] )
       . ']*'
       . quotemeta($astr[$i])
       . ')';
   }
   $rxformed .= '\1';

   print "\n\n============\n";
   print "Search string = '$search_string'\n";
   print "Normalized    = '$str'\n";
   print "Formed regex  = \n$rxformed\n";
}

Output

Found 'bddaaabcabbad'
Found 'abcd'
Found 'dcba'
Found 'abbcdd'


============
Search string = 'abcd'
Normalized    = 'abcd'
Formed regex  =
(?=([abcd]{4,}))(?=[bcd]*a)(?=[acd]*b)(?=[abd]*c)(?=[abc]*d)\1


============
Search string = '%^&*'
Normalized    = '%^&*'
Formed regex  =
(?=([\%\^\&\*]{4,}))(?=[\^\&\*]*\%)(?=[\%\&\*]*\^)(?=[\%\^\*]*\&)(?=[\%\^\&]*\*)\1


============
Search string = 'hi( )there'
Normalized    = 'hi( )ter'
Formed regex  =
(?=([hi\(\ \)ter]{8,}))(?=[i\(\ \)ter]*h)(?=[h\(\ \)ter]*i)(?=[hi\ \)ter]*\()(?=[hi\(\)ter]*\ )(?=[hi\(\ ter]*\))(?=[hi\(\ \)er]*t)(?=[hi\(\ \)tr]*e)(?=[hi\(\ \)te]*r)\1


============
Search string = '==-yes'
Normalized    = '=-yes'
Formed regex  =
(?=([\=\-yes]{5,}))(?=[\-yes]*\=)(?=[\=yes]*\-)(?=[\=\-es]*y)(?=[\=\-ys]*e)(?=[\=\-ye]*s)\1
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Thanks! The latter method works to match the entire string, however I actually need to actually find the character sequence as a substring within a larger body of text. I am not actually sure how the above methods work, so I am having trouble working from it. I have gone through a regex tutorial that covers the above syntax elements, but I don't understand how they are used in this context. Any point in the right direction to understanding this would be much appreciated. –  python whisperer Mar 19 '12 at 0:27
    
@python whisperer - added a regex and explanation to get the substrings you need. As always, if you find these usefull, be sure to upvote and accept an answer (if you can yet). –  sln Mar 20 '12 at 2:36

Why would you use regex here?

def hasChars(search_string, chars):
    return all(x in search_string for x in chars)

>>> hasChars('aaabcd', 'abc')
True
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