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I have a room in which temperature sensors are scattered randomly. The information is:

vector x # x position of all sensors
vector y # y position of all sensors
vector T # temperature values of all sensors

I want to display the info graphically, colored if possible. I tried the mesh it said z must be a matrix.

This thread is very close but I was not able to understand the code. I also did a search here but could not understand it either.

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For the interpolation check out mathworks.nl/help/techdoc/ref/interp2.html that may be what you need. –  Sword22 Mar 18 '12 at 21:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The easiest is to use scatter to plot color-coded temperature information at irregular x,y positions:

%# take some sample data
x = [1.6294 1.8116 0.2540 1.8268 1.2647 0.1951 0.5570 1.0938 1.9150 1.9298 0.3152 1.9412 1.9143 0.9708 1.6006 0.2838 0.8435 1.8315 1.5844 1.9190]
y= [1.3115 0.0714 1.6983 1.8680 1.3575 1.5155 1.4863 0.7845 1.3110 0.3424 1.4121 0.0637 0.5538 0.0923 0.1943 1.6469 1.3897 0.6342 1.9004 0.0689]
T =[0.2072 0.4849 Inf 0.1919 -0.0632 0.0857 -0.2072 0.3756 0.1881 0.1575 -0.1752 0.0640 -0.1117 -0.0623 -0.1140 -0.2051 -0.1817 -0.0420 -0.3398 0.1215]

%# plot using scatter
dfig,scatter(x,y,[],T,'filled')

%# use more sensible colormap, have it range from -0.5 to 0.5 normalized temperature
colormap('hot')
caxis([-0.5 0.5])

%# change background for better contrast
set(gca,'color',[0.5 0.5 0.5])
set(gcf,'color',[0.5 0.5 0.5])

%# highlight outliers (e.g. overly hot readings) with a circle
hold on
hotIdx = T>0.5;
plot(x(hotIdx),y(hotIdx),'og','markerSize',14)

enter image description here

Here's a different colormap, plus text with data values:

cmap = colormap('hot');
cmap = [flipud(cmap);cmap];
colormap(cmap)
caxis([-0.5 0.5])
hold on,for i=1:length(x),text(x(i),y(i)+0.03,num2str(T(i)),'horizontalalignment','center');end

enter image description here

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this is not what I have in mind. –  pac Mar 19 '12 at 15:43
    
@pac: So what did you have in mind? Did you want to plot your temperature data on a regular grid instead of plotting it at the original locations? –  Jonas Mar 19 '12 at 16:43
    
maybe more interesting or real. by the way how can i make this divided into 3 ranges normal temp (normalized) -0.5-->0.5 heat -0.7-->0.5 or 0.5-->0.7 else abnormal –  pac Mar 19 '12 at 17:03
    
@pac: Yes, that should be no problem. I'll add that later. To see how your data looks "real", have you tried my solution with your real data? There should be much more interesting patterns. If you mean another sort of "interesting", i.e. more "flashy" visualization, it would help if you posted some of your data so that we can see what to do with it. –  Jonas Mar 19 '12 at 19:23
    
here are some results: x = 1.6294 1.8116 0.2540 1.8268 1.2647 0.1951 0.5570 1.0938 1.9150 1.9298 0.3152 1.9412 1.9143 0.9708 1.6006 0.2838 0.8435 1.8315 1.5844 1.9190 y=1.3115 0.0714 1.6983 1.8680 1.3575 1.5155 1.4863 0.7845 1.3110 0.3424 1.4121 0.0637 0.5538 0.0923 0.1943 1.6469 1.3897 0.6342 1.9004 0.0689 T =0.2072 0.4849 Inf 0.1919 -0.0632 0.0857 -0.2072 0.3756 0.1881 0.1575 -0.1752 0.0640 -0.1117 -0.0623 -0.1140 -0.2051 -0.1817 -0.0420 -0.3398 0.1215 –  pac Mar 19 '12 at 21:40

If you have temperature readings on a regular grid, i.e. each combination of x and y values has a temperature reading, then you can use surf to plot your data with a pretty surface connecting them. You'll need to form a new temperature matrix T2 of size [m,n] where n=size(x), m=size(y), such that Z(i,j) contains the temperature at (x(j), y(i)). Then you can call surf(x, y, T2).

In the general case, you can just do plot3(x, y, T) to get a set of points.

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can m and n be non-integers? –  pac Mar 18 '12 at 20:25
    
Well you are right @tmpearce it is complicated. there should be a better way.Thanks anyways Sword22 for your help. By the way the area is divided into grids so x and y coordinate range will change. But the total number of nodes are the same in each grid –  pac Mar 19 '12 at 16:52

You must cross reference your x,y and T vectors in a matrix and use two axis vectors as first and second argument. (For surf, which I use).

Basically something like

for i = 1:n
    matrix(x(i),y(i)) = T(i)
end

And make two vectors for the axis.

(I'm not sure if it's () or [] for accesing matrix)

If you don't know what I mean I can take some more time to provide you with a full example.

(Also look "help surf" for the coloring)

matrix = zeros(4000,4000);

axisX = 0:1:3999;
axisY = 0:1:3999;

for i = 1:n
    x(i) = round(1000*x(i));
    y(i) = round(1000*y(i));
end

for i = 1:n
    matrix(x(i),y(i)) = T(i);
end

surf(axisX,axisY,matrix);
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My temperature values are :Columns 1 through 17 Inf 0.0092 -0.0128 0.1223 0.0219 0.3628 0.0624 0.3609 -0.1446 0.1053 -0.0521 0.1200 0.1188 -0.4372 -0.2654 -0.2882 0.0804 Columns 18 through 20 0.2940 -0.0654 0.1625 so the following error was given by matlab/////////; ??? Attempted to access (1.62945,1.31148); index must be a positive integer or logical. when i used your code –  pac Mar 18 '12 at 20:02
    
Ah I found that the problem is with the xy coordinates which are not integers my values of x for example are :x = Columns 1 through 17 2.2133 3.9238 2.0093 3.5498 3.6346 3.7374 2.1689 2.7996 2.5197 3.6001 2.8628 3.8213 2.3637 2.5276 2.2911 2.2721 3.7386 Columns 18 through 20 3.1594 3.0997 2.2899 any advice? –  pac Mar 18 '12 at 20:10
    
Discretise to a certain point. Like you value seems to range from 2 -> 4 : make the matrix like 4000*4000 so you can express 3.6346 as the index 3634. All you will have to do after is change the scale in the graphs. If you want more or less precision you can use bigger or smaller matrix. To discretise you could simply do "round(value*1000)", that's the classical way. –  Sword22 Mar 18 '12 at 21:06
    
I edited my answer for a clear example, but to be honest I don't think that will do what you really want. You should look up bilinear interpolation and check out if there is a built in matlab function that does that. –  Sword22 Mar 18 '12 at 21:25
    
This is overly complicated, and also contains errors. You don't need to have integer values in your axes matrices. And you're only setting values along the diagonal of the matrix. –  tmpearce Mar 18 '12 at 21:28

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