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Why does this code produce seemingly random behavior,

std::cout << ( thePointerIsGood = ( NULL != (aPointer = aFunctionThatReturnsAPointer(args)) ) );

when this multi-line version that does the same thing works just fine?

aPointer = aFunctionThatReturnsAPointer(args);
thePointerIsGood = (NULL != aPointer);
std::cout << thePointerIsGood;

I am capturing aPointer and thePointerIsGood because I use them later on in the code.

Update

The above actually works just fine. But I was able to reproduce some odd behavior with this program, and I've marked where the error occurs:

// Compiled with:
//   gcc test.cpp -c -o test.o; gcc -lstdc++ test.o -o test

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>

  class
AClass
  { public
    : // Operators ///////////////////////////////////////
      ;  const  bool  operator==  (  const  int  rhs  )  ;
      ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

  }
  ;

  class
AHelperClass
  { public
    : // Functions //////////////////////////////////////////////////////
      ;  static  AClass*  AFunctionThatReturnsAPointer  (  int  arg  )  ;
      ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
  }
  ;

  const
  bool
  AClass::
operator==
  (  const  int  rhs  )
  { return (rhs == 222); }

  AClass*
  AHelperClass::
AFunctionThatReturnsAPointer
  (  int  arg  )
  { return ( (arg == 777)
           ? new AClass
           : NULL
           )
           ;
  }

  int
main
  (     int  argc
  ,  char**  argv
  )
  { // Variables //////////////////
    ;  AClass*  aPointer          ;
    ;     bool  thePointerIsGood  ;
    ;     bool  theValueMatches   ;
    ;      int  i                 ;
    ;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

    for ( i = 0
        ; i < 10
        ; i++
        )
        { // First a good pointer
          std::cout << ( ( thePointerIsGood = ( NULL != ( aPointer = AHelperClass::AFunctionThatReturnsAPointer(777) ) ) )
                       ? "Y  "
                       : "N  "
                       )  
                    << ( (thePointerIsGood == true)
                       ? "expected    "
                       : "unexpected  " 
                       )
                    ;

          if ( !thePointerIsGood )
             { std::cout << std::endl; }
          else
             { // This is where the error is, thanks to Peter for pointing it out
               std::cout << ( (theValueMatches = ((*aPointer) == 222))
                            ? "Y  "
                            : "N  "
                            )
                         << ( (theValueMatches == true)
                            ? "expected"
                            : "unexpected"
                            )
                         << std::endl
                         ;
             }


          delete aPointer;

          // Now a NULL pointer
          std::cout << ( ( thePointerIsGood = ( NULL != ( aPointer = AHelperClass::AFunctionThatReturnsAPointer(877) ) ) )
                       ? "Y  "
                       : "N  "
                       )  
                    << ( (thePointerIsGood == false)
                       ? "expected    "
                       : "unexpected  " 
                       )
                    ;

          if ( !thePointerIsGood )
             { std::cout << std::endl; }
          else
             { std::cout << ( (theValueMatches = ((*aPointer) == 222))
                            ? "Y  "
                            : "N  "
                            )
                         << ( (theValueMatches == true)
                            ? "expected"
                            : "unexpected"
                            )
                         << std::endl
                         ;
             }


          delete aPointer;
        }

    return 0;
  }

Which produces for me the following output (everything should say expected)

Y  expected    Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
Y  unexpected  Y  expected
N  unexpected  
share|improve this question
1  
Does args refer in any way to aPointer and/or to thePointerIsGood? Does aFunctionThatReturnsAPointer? –  ruakh Mar 18 '12 at 19:43
2  
please show us the actual code –  Philipp Mar 18 '12 at 19:43
1  
Why even assign to a variable at all before giving it to cout? I'm not a c++ standard expert, but this could cause cout to receive the result of the assignment, rather than what is being assigned to. This would also explain why moving it to multiple lines makes everything work. If you're dead-set on making this code fragment work, I would thumb through the standard and see how cout behavior is defined. More importantly, see if there are any specific conditions resulting in undefined behavior with cout. –  pg1989 Mar 18 '12 at 19:50
1  
@pg1989 - First, I don't see how cout is related at all. As for the variable - he explained why he is assigning to a variable, and (unless operator= is horribly abused) the value of a=b equals to b with the side effect of assigning it to a. This is an interesting question indeed. –  Asaf Mar 18 '12 at 20:05
1  
@Manish - which is what I call 'horribly abused' –  Asaf Mar 18 '12 at 20:23
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My thought is that the following is undefined behaviour:

std::cout << ( (theValueMatches = ((*aPointer) == 222))
                            ? "Y  "
                            : "N  "
                            )
                         << ( (theValueMatches == true)
                            ? "expected"
                            : "unexpected"
                            )
                         << std::endl
                         ;

Because theValueMatches is both used and assigned to in the same expression, and it isn't defined whether the assignment happens before or after the comparison to true. It does surprise me if it seems to be nondeterministic, since you'd expect the compiler to pick one approach or another, although I observe that mine isn't - I get the same output from the program each time, with quite a few unexpecteds in there.

share|improve this answer
    
The answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/2129230/… seems to agree this. –  uesp Mar 18 '12 at 20:44
    
That makes sense to me. I see now how it could be interpreted ambiguously. The problem isn't really the first part of my post at all, but rather this part after it. I don't think I would have thought about this statement the way you just put it for awhile. Thanks! My code is written the way that surely works every time, but I was really curious to why this way wasn't working. –  jnfjnjtj Mar 18 '12 at 20:46
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There is no guarantee in the order of evaluation of expressions. If you have:

x << (a = b) << a;

Then "a" may be evaluated before "(a = b)"

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