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I am trying to implement the following logic in C++. Here x and y are 2 variables of type integer. xs and ys are 2 variables of type string. I wish to convert integer to string and then proceed with the logic.

def isGoodPoint(x,y):
    xs=str(abs(x))
    ys=str(abs(y))
    xsum=0
    ysum=0
    for c in xs:
        xsum=xsum+int(c)
    for c in ys:
        ysum=ysum+int(c)
    if xsum+ysum <=19:
        return True

My C++ Source-code:

Somehow the conversion isn't working and I am getting incorrect values in xs and ys. For example: if my function call is: isGoodPoint(0,0), then during debug mode values in xs and ys are something like 45 and 50 or some weird values. Actually xs and ys should have 0 as their values.

Am I missing something?

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1  
Could you post a valid, compiling C++ code? –  Rafał Rawicki Mar 18 '12 at 20:08
    
Are you sure that it's xs and ys that have weird values? Please check again. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 18 '12 at 20:09
    
def isGoodPoint(x,y): that is not right and strait c++ syntax –  Tim Kachko Mar 18 '12 at 20:09
    
@DmitryKachko: That's the pseudocode that the OP is trying to implement. –  Oli Charlesworth Mar 18 '12 at 20:10
    
There is no such thing as for each in C++. That's probably a Microsoft extension. –  interjay Mar 18 '12 at 20:10
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you probably want is to add the digits of each number. What you are doing now is to add the ASCII value of each digit. If you want to add the digits, you have to substract the first digit's ASCII value:

for each (char c in xs)
    xsum = xsum + (c - '0');

for each (char c in ys)
    ysum = ysum + (c - '0');   

That should do it. In your code, this expression:

 xsum = xsum + int(c);

Creates an int which will hold the value c. Since c is a char and can be converted to an int, what you end up having is just an int that contains the ASCII value of that character.

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