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i m a little confused with normals exported from blender to .obj file I m making a win application to split the obj file to 2 files 1 with vertices and the other with indices , so opengl has less job to do. as i see in faces , i can find the same face but with different normal for example face 24/24/20 and again 24/24/19 and maybe more Is this right? In blender project there is only 1 light source Thanks

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2 Answers

I made some tests and here's how I see these:

The OBJ export script ignores the vertex normals and uses the face normals instead.

To test I made a simple shape, made of 2 triangles like in this image:

enter image description here

And exported to OBJ. You should expect 4 vector normals (vn) since you have 4 vectors, or 3 if opimized, because the 2 vectors in the middle are the same. But instead it ouputs only 2 vn-s:

vn -0.000000 1.000000 0.000000
vn -1.000000 -0.000000 -0.000000

Whats more, if you look at the face definitions, you'll find something more interesting:

f 1//1 4//1 3//1

f 4//2 2//2 3//2

Look at the numbers after the //'s in a single row. They are the same. This means that for all vertices within one face uses the same normal. Which means, these are not the normals of the vertices, but normals of the faces. So this is why assigns different normals for the same vertices. When vertex no. 4 is used to define the first face receives the normal of the first face, and when it's used to define the 2nd face, the 2nd face's normal is used.

EDIT You can calculate the vertex normal from these like this:

  • Find every occurrence of a vertex and get all of it's normals into a set A
  • Add the respective coordinates of the normals: vn = (x1 + x2 + ... + xn, y1 + y2 + ... + yn, z1 + z2 + ... + zn)
  • Calculate vector length: h = sqrt(vnx^2 + vny^2 + vnz^2)
  • Normalize vector vn: vn = (vnx / h, vny / h, vnz / h)

Using my previous example (the one found on the image), the vector on top and bottom only occurs one time, so you don't need to do anything (the normal of the vertex is the same as the normal of the face). On the vertexes at middle: they occur twice, once for the top triangle, with normal of (0, 1, 0) and on the bottom one (-1, 0, 0), thus our sets of normals for these vertexes are {(0, 1, 0), (-1, 0, 0)}. Adding these gives: (0 - 1, 1 + 0, 0 + 0) = (-1, 1, 0). Calculating the length: h = sqrt((-1)^2 + 1^2) = sqrt(2). Dividing the vector with it gives norm(vn) = vn / h = (-1 / sqrt(2), 1 / sqrt(2), 0). If you look at the picture on the Front Ortho (top left) at the middle normal you'll see that has a -x and a +y equal component, while the vector has a length 1. You can see that our result has length 1 by calculating it's length again: 1/2 + 1/2 + 0 = 1. That is why we had to normalize, to get a length 1.

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Thanks for our reply SinistraD. so that mean that its useless to export and use tha normals from blender , and we have to make our owns?? –  DavinCode Mar 18 '12 at 22:00
    
You can use the face's normals to calculate vertex's normals. Updated answer: added procedure and an example. –  SinistraD Mar 18 '12 at 23:46
    
Thank you for your comments. they are realy very useful. –  DavinCode Mar 23 '12 at 9:12
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@SinistraD Thank you for your comments. they are realy very useful. After trying to figure out how to export from blender per vertex normals , i found that there is an option at object tools>shading>smooth , or flat. if you choose smooth , and then export the object as obj file , the normals are per vertex , i dint try it yet to my project (i m building the shaders right now) but i will soon. see an example of an exported cube with this method.

Blender v2.61 (sub 0) OBJ File: ''

www.blender.org

v 11.209502 -11.209502 -11.209501
v 11.209502 -11.209502 11.209502
v -11.209503 -11.209502 11.209500
v -11.209498 -11.209502 -11.209506
v 11.209508 11.209502 -11.209496
v 11.209495 11.209502 11.209509
v -11.209506 11.209502 11.209498
v -11.209501 11.209502 -11.209502
vt 0.652335 0.642748
vt 0.653298 0.956858
vt 0.339188 0.957821
vt 0.338225 0.643711
vt 0.968372 0.643711
vt 0.967408 0.957821
vt 0.654262 0.642748
vt 0.967408 0.327674
vt 0.968372 0.641784
vt 0.653298 0.328638
vt 0.339188 0.642748
vt 0.338225 0.328638
vt 0.652335 0.327674
vt 0.653298 0.641784
vt 0.337261 0.642748
vt 0.338225 0.956858
vt 0.024115 0.957821
vt 0.023151 0.643711
vt 0.337261 0.327674
vt 0.338225 0.641784
vt 0.024115 0.642748
vt 0.023151 0.328638
vn 0.577349 -0.577349 -0.577349
vn 0.577349 -0.577349 0.577349
vn -0.577349 -0.577349 0.577349
vn -0.577349 -0.577349 -0.577349
vn 0.577349 0.577349 -0.577349
vn -0.577349 0.577349 -0.577349
vn -0.577349 0.577349 0.577349
vn 0.577349 0.577349 0.577349
s 1
f 1/1/1 2/2/2 3/3/3 4/4/4
f 5/5/5 8/6/6 7/2/7 6/7/8
f 1/8/1 5/9/5 6/7/8 2/10/2
f 2/11/2 6/12/8 7/13/7 3/14/3
f 3/15/3 7/16/7 8/17/6 4/18/4
f 5/19/5 1/20/1 4/21/4 8/22/6

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nice thing to know, good job finding this –  SinistraD Mar 23 '12 at 14:22
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