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I typically develop in MS Access and occasionally connect to a MySQL back end. I have a MySQL back end that isn't cascading deletes as I'd expect when I delete records. I'm wondering if it's because of how I've set up the table relationships (foreign keys). I don't know enough about MySQL to know if I've done this right. In designer view I set up the relationships using the designer view in MySQL. For a composite primary key field (InterviewID, Coder ID) in tblInterviews I created two separate relations to tblSB for each of these two primary key fields (tblSB includes a 3rd field, SBid, as its composite PK). The designer view is a little different from Access in that you can't highlight more than one field at a time to set up relationships. I did find forums that discuss the syntax for setting up the relationship with the foreign key but I don't know if it's equivalent to what I did in designer. I suspect not because currently when I try to delete a specific record (unique InterviewID, CoderID combination) ALL interview records for the CoderID in the InterviewID, CoderID combination get deleted (and this cascades through to other child tables as well). I also am wondering if I need to set up my primary key in a way that I am not currently doing (e.g., setting it up as an index, also). Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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You probably defined 2 FK constraints (one on each column, referencing separately each one of the 2 columns of the PK), instead of one FK (on the composite 2-column referencing the composite PK). –  ypercube Mar 19 '12 at 0:00
    
Or you defined the FK, in the wrong direction. –  ypercube Mar 19 '12 at 0:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To see what you've created, look at the DDL. (SHOW CREATE TABLE)

To enforce foreign key constraints--including cascading deletes--you probably want to use the innodb engine. The myisam engine will accept DDL that declares foreign keys, but it won't enforce them.

MySQL will let a foreign key target a non-unique column. The MySQL docs say

Deviation from SQL standards: A FOREIGN KEY constraint that references a non-UNIQUE key is not standard SQL. It is an InnoDB extension to standard SQL.

They call it an extension to SQL. I call it a mistake.

It means you can declare tblSB.interviewID as a foreign key referencing tblInterviews.interviewID. A standard SQL dbms wouldn't allow that.

The 5.6 docs say

However, the system does not enforce a requirement that the referenced columns be UNIQUE or be declared NOT NULL. The handling of foreign key references to nonunique keys or keys that contain NULL values is not well defined for operations such as UPDATE or DELETE CASCADE. You are advised to use foreign keys that reference only UNIQUE and NOT NULL keys.

To my way of thinking, they're saying, "It was a bad idea, but we don't know how to fix it. So it's up to you to avoid it. We could warn you when you try it, but we're not going to do that, either."


Based on your comments, I'd say this constraint is right . . .

CONSTRAINT tblInterviewRecordtblSB 
FOREIGN KEY (InterviewID, CoderID) 
  REFERENCES tblinterviewrecord (InterviewID, CoderID) 
  ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE

but these two are not, and should be deleted.

CONSTRAINT tblSB_ibfk_1 
FOREIGN KEY (InterviewID) 
  REFERENCES tblinterviewrecord (InterviewID) 
  ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE, 
CONSTRAINT tblSB_ibfk_2 
FOREIGN KEY (CoderID) 
  REFERENCES tblinterviewrecord (CoderID) 
  ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
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Ok, all tables are definitely InnoDB. I'm pretty sure that I defined the FK in the correct direction but it sounds like separate relationships on the two fields of the fk is not the same as a relationship on the composite. I'll have to check the DDL in the morning--no access at the moment. –  bugdrown Mar 19 '12 at 1:24
    
That's right, two relationships on the two columns is not the same as one relationship on the pair. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Mar 19 '12 at 1:46
    
I checked SHOW CREATE TABLE to see what I have and here are the results. It's really not clear to me whether this is correct for what I need: –  bugdrown Mar 19 '12 at 12:46
    
tblSB---For parent table tblInterviewRecord---... PRIMARY KEY (InterviewID,CoderID), KEY CoderID (CoderID), KEY InterviewID (InterviewID), KEY tblIntervieweeTypestblInterviewRecord (IntervieweeTypeID), CONSTRAINT tblinterviewrecord_ibfk_1 FOREIGN KEY (CoderID) REFERENCES tblcoders (CoderID) ) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 –  bugdrown Mar 19 '12 at 12:52
    
For child table tblSB---... UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, PRIMARY KEY (InterviewID,CoderID,SB_ID), KEY CoderID (CoderID), KEY InterviewID (InterviewID), KEY SB_ID (SB_ID), CONSTRAINT tblInterviewRecordtblSB FOREIGN KEY (InterviewID, CoderID) REFERENCES tblinterviewrecord (InterviewID, CoderID) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE, CONSTRAINT tblSB_ibfk_1 FOREIGN KEY (InterviewID) REFERENCES tblinterviewrecord (InterviewID) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE, –  bugdrown Mar 19 '12 at 12:58

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