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So I'm playing around with linked lists, trying to get my brain around them, and I decided to add "ordinal" values to each node in my list. This way, I can delete by ordinal rather than value, and do some other cool stuff later on.

Only, when I delete an element from the list all the ordinals get thrown out of whack (fairly obvious, that), so I thought "ok, I'll just run up the list in a different function, resetting all of the ordinals". I could technically start this function at the element that got deleted and pass it in the ordinal from that node to save time, as the previous nodes should be untouched, but for now I'm doing it the less elegant way because I said so.

"What is your question?". I knew you'd ask that! "Get on with it!" I knew you'd say that!

The test program, which I can link to or include here, just creates a list of 5 nodes, removes the 3rd node and then adds a node onto the end.

The expected output is: DEBUG: resetting ordinals: 0 1 2 3 4

The actual output is: DEBUG: resetting ordinals: 1 2 4 5 5

So, without any further ado, here is my question: Why is the actual output different from my expectations?

void ll_fix(node_t* list)
{
  node_t* root = list;
  int ordinal = 0;
  printf("DEBUG: resetting ordinals: ");
  while(list->next != NULL)
  {
    list->ordinal = ordinal;
    list = (node_t*)list->next;
    printf("%d ",list->ordinal);
    ordinal++;
  }
  printf("%d\n",list->ordinal);
  list = root; // rewind the list
}
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Good point, editing expected output (the code is copy-pasted, so it is the real code). –  Chris Browne Mar 18 '12 at 21:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are printing the ordinal before the change to it. So you see the previous values.

Should probably be:

list->ordinal = ordinal;
printf("%d ",list->ordinal);
list = (node_t*)list->next;
ordinal++;

This will not change the last value though, a better fix is:

while(list != NULL) { // as per wildplasser comment, I moved the check to the beginning
    list->ordinal = ordinal;
    printf("%d ",list->ordinal);
    ordinal++;
    list = list->next;
}
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Look more closely, I'm printing "list->ordinal" and changing "ordinal". I guess I should've named the variables differently, to avoid such confusion. –  Chris Browne Mar 18 '12 at 21:54
    
You move to the next one before printing list->ordinal see my example. –  MByD Mar 18 '12 at 21:55
    
@ChrisBrowne You are changing list, so list->ordinal is not what you just set. +1, well spotted. –  cnicutar Mar 18 '12 at 21:56
1  
@ChrisBrowne - see edit. as I missed something before. –  MByD Mar 18 '12 at 22:00
1  
The do {} while() version will misbehave if the list argument happens to be NULL. –  wildplasser Mar 18 '12 at 22:07

You are moving the list pointer between setting the ordinal and printing,

while(list->next != NULL)
{
    list->ordinal = ordinal;
    list = (node_t*)list->next;
    printf("%d ",list->ordinal);
    ordinal++;
}

So you're printing the wrong values. Also "rewinding the list" is superfluous, since list is a local variable, it doesn't affect anything outside the function.

list = root; // rewind the list
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It's passed by reference, so rewinding isn't superfluous. –  Chris Browne Mar 18 '12 at 21:58
    
No, you're passing a pointer by value, not a node by reference. So you can modify the nodes, but not the pointer that was passed. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 18 '12 at 22:00
    
You're right. Pointer-by-value. I can safely remove the "rewinding" bits from my code. Thanks! –  Chris Browne Mar 18 '12 at 22:01

You are not checking list for NULL before dereferencing it for next in the while loop test. That can result in a segmentation fault. I would do it something like this:

  while(list != NULL)
  {
    list->ordinal = ordinal;
    printf("%d ",list->ordinal);
    ordinal++;
    list = list->next;
  }

This should give you the output:

DEBUG: resetting ordinals: 0 1 2 3 4
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You are checking the -> next pointer, while you should be checking the current element.

void ll_fix(node_t *list)
{
  node_t *tmp;
  int ordinal = 0;
  printf("DEBUG: resetting ordinals:");
  for (tmp=list; tmp; tmp = tmp->next)
  {
    tmp->ordinal = ordinal++;
    printf(" %d", tmp->ordinal);
  }
  printf("\n" );
}
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