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Okay, this may not be the smartest idea but I was a bit curious if this is possible. Say I have two lists:

list1 = [3,2,4,1, 1]
list2 = [three, two, four, one, one2]

If I run list1.sort(), it'll sort it to [1,1,2,3,4] but is there a way to get to keep list2 in sync as well(so I can say item 4 belongs to 'three')? My problem is I have a pretty complex program that is working fine with lists but I sort of need to start referencing some data. I know this is a perfect situation for dictionaries but I'm trying to avoid dictionaries in my processing because I do need to sort the key values(if I must use dictionaries I know how to use them).

Basically the nature of this program is, the data comes in a random order(like above), I need to sort it, process it and then send out the results(order doesn't matter but users need to know which result belongs to which key). I thought about putting it in a dictionary first, then sorting list one but I would have no way of differentiating of items in the with the same value if order is not maintained(it may have an impact when communicating the results to users). So ideally, once I get the lists I would rather figure out a way to sort both lists together. Is this possible?

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I should point out that your variables in list2 don't point to the ints in list1. E.g. if change a value such as list1[0]=9 and look at list2, list2[0] will still be 3. With integers in python, it doesn't use the reference/pointer, it copies the value. You would have been better off going list2 = list1[:] –  robert king Mar 19 '12 at 3:10

7 Answers 7

up vote 33 down vote accepted

One classic approach to this problem is to use the "decorate, sort, undecorate" idiom, which is especially simple using python's built-in zip function:

>>> list1 = [3,2,4,1, 1]
>>> list2 = ['three', 'two', 'four', 'one', 'one2']
>>> list1, list2 = zip(*sorted(zip(list1, list2)))
>>> list1
(1, 1, 2, 3, 4)
>>> list2 
('one', 'one2', 'two', 'three', 'four')

These of course are no longer lists, but that's easily remedied, if it matters:

>>> list1, list2 = (list(t) for t in zip(*sorted(zip(list1, list2))))
>>> list1
[1, 1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> list2
['one', 'one2', 'two', 'three', 'four']

It's worth noting that the above sacrifices speed for terseness; the in-place version, which takes up 3 lines, is a tad faster on my machine:

>>> %timeit zip(*sorted(zip(list1, list2)))
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.3 us per loop
>>> %timeit tups = zip(list1, list2); tups.sort(); zip(*tups)
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.84 us per loop
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This is amazing..thank you. Never thought of using zip like that. –  Error_404 Mar 19 '12 at 2:58
1  
what does the asterisk in the third line represent? –  Jeffrey Mar 19 '12 at 5:25
1  
@Jeffrey: it's a splat –  georg Mar 19 '12 at 8:48
1  
To elaborate on the above, the * operator does argument unpacking, –  senderle Mar 19 '12 at 15:46
    
The sorted index/map paradigm suggested by J.F. Sebastian is about 10% faster than either zip solution for me (using lists of 10000 random ints): %timeit index = range(len(l1)); index.sort(key=l1.__getitem__); map(l1.__getitem__, index); map(l2.__getitem__, index) 100 loops, best of 3: 8.04 ms per loop (vs 9.17 ms, 9.07 ms for senderle's timits) –  Quantum7 Aug 12 '13 at 21:35

You can sort indexes using values as keys:

indexes = range(len(list1))
indexes.sort(key=list1.__getitem__)

To get sorted lists given sorted indexes:

sorted_list1 = map(list1.__getitem__, indexes)
sorted_list2 = map(list2.__getitem__, indexes)

In your case you shouldn't have list1, list2 but rather a single list of pairs:

data = [(3, 'three'), (2, 'two'), (4, 'four'), (1, 'one'), (1, 'one2')]

It is easy to create; it is easy to sort in Python:

data.sort() # sort using a pair as a key

Sort by the first value only:

data.sort(key=lambda pair: pair[0])
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Schwartzian transform. The built-in Python sorting is stable, so the two 1s don't cause a problem.

>>> l1 = [3, 2, 4, 1, 1]
>>> l2 = ['three', 'two', 'four', 'one', 'second one']
>>> zip(*sorted(zip(l1, l2)))
[(1, 1, 2, 3, 4), ('one', 'second one', 'two', 'three', 'four')]
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However, if you find you need to do this, you should strongly re-consider having the two "parallel" lists of data, as opposed to keeping a list of 2-tuples (pairs)... or perhaps even actually creating a class. –  Karl Knechtel Mar 19 '12 at 2:47

What about:

list1 = [3,2,4,1, 1]
list2 = ['three', 'two', 'four', 'one', 'one2']

sortedRes = sorted(zip(list1, list2), key=lambda x: x[0]) # use 0 or 1 depending on what you want to sort
>>> [(1, 'one'), (1, 'one2'), (2, 'two'), (3, 'three'), (4, 'four')]
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One way is to track where each index goes to by sorting the identity [0,1,2,..n]

This works for any number of lists.

Then move each item to its position. Using splices is best.

list1 = [3,2,4,1, 1]
list2 = ['three', 'two', 'four', 'one', 'one2']

index = range(len(list1))
print index
'[0, 1, 2, 3, 4]'

index.sort(key = list1.__getitem__)
print index
'[3, 4, 1, 0, 2]'

list1[:] = [list1[i] for i in index]
list2[:] = [list2[i] for i in index]

print list1
print list2
'[1, 1, 2, 3, 4]'
"['one', 'one2', 'two', 'three', 'four']"

Note we could have iterated the lists without even sorting them:

list1_iter = (list1[i] for i in index)
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You can use the zip() and sort() functions to accomplish this:

Python 2.6.5 (r265:79063, Jun 12 2010, 17:07:01)
[GCC 4.3.4 20090804 (release) 1] on cygwin
>>> list1 = [3,2,4,1,1]
>>> list2 = ['three', 'two', 'four', 'one', 'one2']
>>> zipped = zip(list1, list2)
>>> zipped.sort()
>>> slist1 = [i for (i, s) in zipped]
>>> slist1
[1, 1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> slist2 = [s for (i, s) in zipped]
>>> slist2
['one', 'one2', 'two', 'three', 'four']

Hope this helps

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I have used the answer given by senderle for a long time until I discovered np.argsort. Here is how it works.

list1 = [3,2,4,1]
list2 = ["three","two","four","one"]
idx   = np.argsort(list1)

list1 = list1[idx]
list2 = list2[idx]

I find this solution more intuitive, and it works really well. The perfomance:

def sorting(l1, l2):
    # l1 and l2 has to be numpy arrays
    idx = np.argsort(l1)
    return l1[idx], l2[idx]

# list1 and list2 are np.arrays here...
%timeit sorting(list1, list2)
100000 loops, best of 3: 3.53 us per loop

# This works best when the lists are NOT np.array
%timeit zip(*sorted(zip(list1, list2)))
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.41 us per loop

# 0.01us better for np.array (I think this is negligible)
%timeit tups = zip(list1, list2); tups.sort(); zip(*tups)
100000 loops, best for 3 loops: 1.96 us per loop

Even though np.argsort isn't the fastest one, I find it easier to use.

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