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I've typed it exactly as shown in Introduction to Java Programming (Comprehensive, 6e). It's pertaining to reading integer input and comparing user input to the integers stored in a text file named "lottery.txt"

An image of the folder and input file An external link of the image: http://imgur.com/wMK2t

Here's my code:

import java.util.Scanner;

public class LotteryNumbers {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        // Defines and initializes an array with 100 double elements called isCovered.
        boolean[] isCovered = new boolean[99];

        // Prompts user for input and marks typed numbers as covered.
        int number = input.nextInt();
        while (number != 0) {
            isCovered[number - 1] = true;
            number = input.nextInt();
        }

        // Checks whether all numbers are covered.
        boolean allCovered = true;
        for (int i = 0; i < 99; i++)
            if (!isCovered[i]) {
                allCovered = false;
                break;
            }

        // Outputs result.
        if(allCovered) {
            System.out.println("The tickets cover all numbers."); }
        else {
            System.out.println("The tickets do not cover all numbers."); }

    }
}

I suspect the problem lies within the declaration of the array. Since lottery.txt does not have 100 integers, the elements from index 10 to 99 in the array are left blank. Could this be the problem?

Why does the program terminate without asking for user input?

Possible Solution:

After thinking for a while, I believe I understand the problem. The program terminates because it takes the 0 at the EOF when lottery.txt is feed in. Furthermore, the program displays all numbers not to be covered because the elements from 11 to 100 are blank. Is this right?

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Cut him some slack, He's made some effort. It's a noobish question but the downvote is a bit harsh. –  nikhil Mar 19 '12 at 6:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The program is written to keep reading numbers until a zero is returned by nextInt(). But there is no zero in the input file, so the loop will just keep going to the end of the file ... and then fail when it tries to read an integer at the EOF position.

The solution is to use Scanner.hasNextInt() to test whether you should end the loop.


And, make sure that you redirect standard input from your input file; e.g.

    $ java LotteryNumbers < lottery.txt

... 'cos your program expects the input to appear on the standard input stream.

share|improve this answer
    
Please see the revised image. Although I agree that the Scanner.hasNextInt() method is probably a better way to go, I still don't understand why the code I typed exactly from the book does not work! –  Ernie Chu Mar 19 '12 at 4:43
    
I don't quite understand what you mean by "standard input stream." Could you please explain? Typing this in console produces a "command not recognized" error. –  Ernie Chu Mar 19 '12 at 4:48
    
After thinking for a while, I believe I understand the problem. The program terminates because it takes the 0 at the EOF when lottery.txt is feed in. Furthermore, the program displays all numbers not to be covered because the elements from 11 to 100 are blank. Is this right? –  Ernie Chu Mar 19 '12 at 4:59
    
That is correct. –  Stephen C Mar 19 '12 at 5:05
    
For my future reference, I will remember that "standard input stream" is the keyboard. Thanks! –  Ernie Chu Mar 19 '12 at 5:05

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