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I've got a View with a form where I want a DropDownList that displays categories with an option where the user can add a new category in a text box:

<div class="editor-field">
        @Html.DropDownListFor(model => model.Category_ID, (SelectList) ViewBag.CatIDs, "- Select a Category -")
        or add a new category
        @Html.TextBox("NewCategory")
        @Html.ActionLink("New Category", "AddCategory", null, new { id = "add" })
    </div>

If a new category is entered in the textbox rather than selecting from the ddl, the validation complains about no selection made. Is there a way to turn this off in the case where the textbox is not empty?

Another option I considered is a button for adding a new category, which should add a new record to the database and update the dropdownlist. But that will post the whole form (and cause all the other fields on the page to be validated). Is there a way to post just part of the form for one button and the whole form for another?

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2 Answers 2

I guess that your view model right now looks something along the lines of:

public class MyViewModel
{
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please select a category")]
    public int? Category_ID { get; set; }

    public string NewCategory { get; set; }
}

One possibility is to write a custom validation attribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
public class RequiredIfOtherPropertyIsNull : ValidationAttribute
{
    private readonly string _otherProperty;
    public RequiredIfOtherPropertyIsNull(string otherProperty)
    {
        _otherProperty = otherProperty;
    }

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        var property = validationContext.ObjectType.GetProperty(_otherProperty);
        if (property == null)
        {
            return new ValidationResult(
                string.Format(
                    CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, 
                    "Could not find a property named {0}", 
                    _otherProperty
                )
            );
        }
        var otherValue = property.GetValue(validationContext.ObjectInstance, null);
        if (otherValue == null && value == null)
        {
            return new ValidationResult(FormatErrorMessage(validationContext.DisplayName));
        }

        return null;
    }
}

and then:

public class MyViewModel
{
    [RequiredIfOtherPropertyIsNull("NewCategory", ErrorMessage = "Please select a category")]
    public int? Category_ID { get; set; }

    public string NewCategory { get; set; }
}

Another, and IMHO far better way, is to use FluentValidation.NET instead of DataAnnotations for validation. It integrates nicely with ASP.NET MVC and makes such validation scenarios a piece of cake.

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My view model is called Category and has a Name field rather than NewCategory (this is the id for the textbox where a new Category Name is entered). FWIW, the Category class was generated by EF database first. The annotation did not prevent the default one from firing. I will check out the FluentValidation, looks nice. –  mjo Mar 19 '12 at 19:37
    
BTW, my current solution uses the { id = "add" } on the ActionLink to fire a little jQuery that appends the NewCategory as a url query string which the controller action uses to create the new category and then redirects you back so the new item shows up in the ddl. Works ok, although of course values in other fields on the form will be lost. –  mjo Mar 19 '12 at 19:51

You can even made the ddl to act as TextBox when you want to insert a new value

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You mean add the new value right in the ddl? I like that idea. How is that done? –  mjo Mar 19 '12 at 19:32

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