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I am making a website and I'm trying to vertically center:

 position: absolute;
 width:1200px;
 height:600px;
 top: 50%;
 left: 50%;
 margin-left: -600px;

and my HTML is a single div

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Doing left: 50%; and then margin-left: -600px; doesn't make much sense, since you're just canceling the one out with the other. –  Jared Farrish Mar 19 '12 at 5:55
    
swenflea: I edited my question with information on the parent element's position effect. –  Jared Farrish Mar 19 '12 at 6:19
    
Actually, can you be more specific with the Question? Do you want your DIV to be at the Center of the Page. I mean exact center....? –  Vijay Sarin Mar 19 '12 at 6:30

5 Answers 5

The CSS property top works exactly as left. It pushes the div from that direction. When you write top:50%, the div will be pushed down 50% from the top. You want it to be centered vertically, so you need to counter this by pulling it back up. This can be done using margin-top: -300px just like you used margin-left: -600px to pull it left.

position: absolute;
width: 1200px;
height: 600px;
top: 50%;
margin-top: -300px;
left: 50%;
margin-left: -600px;
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+1 for a straightforward reply that delivers –  o.v. Mar 19 '12 at 7:04

top:50%; works fine, but wont "center" the item, it will place it's top edge 50% of the page's height from the top. Similarly to how you have margin-left:-600px; you should also add margin-top:-300px;

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Sorry that doesn't work... it just sticks it -300px from the top of the page... Do I need to have any styling on outer divs or inner divs? –  swenflea Mar 19 '12 at 5:37
    
Are you experiencing this in a specific browser? So long as it's position:absolute, the styles on the containing elements shouldn't matter unless the selector you're using is more specific and is overriding the style you listed above. –  lukiffer Mar 19 '12 at 5:47

I believe this may somewhat mimic the answer Kristian gave, but here's my two cents, which includes using percentages and also demonstrates one inside another:

#parent {
    position: absolute;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    width: 120px;
    height: 60px;
    margin: -60px 0 0 -30px;
    background: blue;
}
#center {
    position: absolute;
    width: 50%;
    height: 50%;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    margin: -12.5% 0 0 -25%;
    background: green;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/userdude/MYD27/

EDIT

Looking at it further, I think you might run into issues if you're trying to do this with an element not container within a positioned element. For instance:

Full View | Code View

I don't think works the way you intended. When I add position: relative (or alternatively position: absolute), it does work I think as you intended:

Full View | Code View

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+1 for the explanation about the position: relative (or absolute) in the parent DIV. That is what made it work for me. –  Alexis Wilke Jan 17 at 2:50

I'd like to take this opportunity to blatantly self-promote my answer to another question here on SO :)

That being said, css "top" property gets correctly calculated based on the container element's height - effectively rendering the target element below the midline. What this means is the element needs to be pushed half-way up as explained in the linked question.

Unfortunately such a seemingly straightforward task cannot be accomplished by adjusting top margin etc. without using absolute pixel-based values (+1 for Kristian Antonsen's answer) - one would imagine setting margin-top to "-50%" would mean just that, but according to css spec, margin values even on the vertical axis are calculated as a percentage always relative to the width of the containing block

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You can use

calc(%50 - (items_height/2));

to center.

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