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Git has a well-known, or at least sort-of-well-known, empty tree whose SHA1 is:

4b825dc642cb6eb9a060e54bf8d69288fbee4904

(you can see this in any repo, even a newly created one, with git cat-file -t and git cat-file -p).

If you work hard and are very careful you can sort of use this empty tree to store a directory that has no files (see answer to How do I add an empty directory to a git repository), although it's not really a great idea.

It's more useful as one argument to git diff-tree, which one of the sample hooks does.

What I'm wondering is,

  1. how reliable is this—i.e., will some future version of git not have a git object numbered 4b825dc642cb6eb9a060e54bf8d69288fbee4904?
  2. Why is there no symbolic name for the empty tree (or is there one?).

(A quick and dirty way to create a symbolic name is to put the SHA1 in, e.g., .git/Nulltree. Unfortunately you have to do this for every repo. Seems better to just put the magic number in scripts, etc. I just have a general aversion to magic numbers.)

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2 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted

This thread mentions:

If you don't remember the empty tree sha1, you can always derive it with:

git hash-object -t tree /dev/null

So I guess it is safer to define a variable with the result of that command as your empty sha1 tree (instead of relying of a "well known value").


Note, you will see that SHA1 pop up on some GitHub repo when the author wants its first commit to be empty (see blog post "How I initialize my Git repositories"):

$ GIT_AUTHOR_DATE="Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 +0000" GIT_COMMITTER_DATE="Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 +0000" git commit --allow-empty -m 'Initial commit'

Will give you:

Empty tree SHA1

(See the tree SHA1?)

You can even rebase your existing history on top of that empty commit (see "git: how to insert a commit as the first, shifting all the others?")

In both cases, you don't rely on the exact SHA1 value of that empty tree.
You simply follow a best practice, initializing your repo with a first empty commit.


To do that:

git init my_new_repo
cd my_new_repo
git config user.name username
git config user.email email@com

git commit --allow-empty -m "initial empty commit"

That will generate a commit with a SHA1 specific to your repo, username, email, date of creation (meaning the SHA1 of the commit itself will be different every time).
But the tree referenced by that commit will be 4b825dc642cb6eb9a060e54bf8d69288fbee4904, the empty tree SHA1.

git log --pretty=raw

commit 9ed4ff9ac204f20f826ddacc3f85ef7186d6cc14
tree 4b825dc642cb6eb9a060e54bf8d69288fbee4904      <====
author VonC <vonc@laposte.net> 1381232247 +0200
committer VonC <vonc@laposte.net> 1381232247 +0200

    initial empty commit

To show just the tree of a commit (display the commit tree SHA1):

git show --pretty=format:%T 9ed4ff9ac204f20f826ddacc3f85ef7186d6cc14
4b825dc642cb6eb9a060e54bf8d69288fbee4904

If that commit, referencing an empty tree, is indeed your first commit, you can show that empty tree SHA1 with:

git log --pretty=format:%h --reverse | head -1 | xargs git show --pretty=format:%T
4b825dc642cb6eb9a060e54bf8d69288fbee4904

(and that even works on Windows, with Gnu On Windows commands)

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Ah, nice. Handy way of avoiding the magic number. –  torek Mar 19 '12 at 7:39
    
@torek: I have added some examples arund the first empty commit best practice to illustrate that empty tree SHA1. –  VonC Mar 19 '12 at 7:53
    
Well, one of the goals is to use the "empty tree" hash as an argument to git diff-tree in some scripts I'm writing. There's no guarantee that there is an initial empty commit in the repo. So I'm just wondering if these scripts might end up breaking someday. –  torek Mar 19 '12 at 20:57
1  
If you pass -w to git hash-object, it'll create the object in the repository it's run against, and that would recreate the empty tree in the repository you're running against were it to ever go away in the future. –  javawizard Jan 3 at 7:49
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I wrote up a blog post with two different ways of finding the hash: http://colinschimmelfing.com/blog/gits-empty-tree/

If it were to ever change for some reason, you could use the two ways below to find it. However, I would feel pretty confident using the hash in .bashrc aliases, etc., and I don't think it will change anytime soon. At the very least it would probably be a major release of git.

The two ways are:

  1. The answer above: git hash-object -t tree --stdin < /dev/null
  2. Simply initing an empty repo and then running git write-tree in that new repo - the hash will be output by git write-tree.
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