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This is my first time using Xcode and it is appalling to me how completely non intuitive this IDE is. I heard it was better in the past and I really hope it was.

My problem is that the resources my program loads, a data file and an .ini file, it automatically searches for these file in my Home folder. I want for it to search for these files in the Resource folder of the .app. I am using C++ and all of the examples I have found are for Objective-C.

Any idea on how to fix this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are probably assuming that, when your app launches, the current working directory of the process is your app's bundle. It isn't. (Nothing to do with Xcode particularly -- that's just how OS X works.)

Typically you would use NSBundle (Objective-C) or CFBundle (C) to find resources in your app bundle. Since you're using C++, let's use the C API.

To find the URL to a file "myFile.ini" in the Resources directory in your app bundle:

CFBundleRef mainBundle = CFBundleGetMainBundle();
CFURLRef url = CFBundleCopyResourceURL(mainBundle, CFSTR("myFile"), CFSTR("ini"), NULL);
UInt8 filePath[PATH_MAX];
if (CFURLGetFileSystemRepresentation(url, true, filePath, sizeof(filePath)))
{
    // use your API of choice to open and read the file at filePath
}

Or, to just change the CWD to your app bundle:

CFBundleRef mainBundle = CFBundleGetMainBundle();
CFURLRef url = CFBundleCopyBundleURL(mainBundle);
UInt8 bundlePath[PATH_MAX];
if (CFURLGetFileSystemRepresentation(url, true, bundlePath, sizeof(bundlePath)))
{
    if (chdir((const char*)bundlePath) == 0)
    {
        // now the CWD is your app bundle, and you can use relative path names to access files inside it
    }
}
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I am not really sure what I was thinking. I mean, I know an .exe by default will use resources that are in the same folder. And I know that OSX uses the .app container. Thanks for the answer. The C version of this was what I was after and you delivered. –  Satchmo Brown Mar 19 '12 at 7:35
    
I hate to ask, but how would I actually use this. Now that I have the file path, what does it actually represent. How would I open a file stream to that filePath. –  Satchmo Brown Mar 19 '12 at 8:00
    
A file path is a string like "/path/to/my.app/Resources/myFile.ini". Do you have a particular file IO API in mind? The ones in the standard C and C++ libraries work fine, but there are plenty of others... Since you were talking about .exes and Windows, I assumed you were porting some existing code, and if that code is using the standard libraries then it should just work. –  Kurt Revis Mar 19 '12 at 8:10
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