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I'm trying to draw a procedural sphere referenced here.

I modified it a bit so that I can use the glDrawElements method of OpenGL ES 2.0

Here's my version of createSphere:

GLfloat sphereVerticies[10000]={0.0};
GLubyte triangleIndices[15000]={0};

int createSphere (GLfloat spherePoints[], GLubyte triangleIndices[], GLfloat fRadius, GLfloat step)
{
    int points = 0;

    GLfloat uStep = DEGREES_TO_RADIANS (step);
    GLfloat vStep = uStep;

    unsigned long index=0;

    for (GLfloat u = 0.0f; u <= (2 * M_PI); u += uStep) 
    {
        for (GLfloat v = -M_PI_2; v <= M_PI_2; v += vStep) 
        {               
            triangleIndices[index++]=points;
            triangleIndices[index++]=points+1;
            triangleIndices[index++]=points+2;
            triangleIndices[index++]=points+2;
            triangleIndices[index++]=points+3;
            triangleIndices[index++]=points;

            points++;
            spherePoints[(points - 1) * 3] = fRadius * cosf(v) * cosf(u);             // x
            spherePoints[((points - 1) * 3) + 1] = fRadius * cosf(v) * sinf(u);       // y
            spherePoints[((points - 1) * 3) + 2] = fRadius * sinf(v);                 // z

            points++;
            spherePoints[(points - 1) * 3] = fRadius * cosf(v) * cosf(u + uStep);             // x
            spherePoints[((points - 1) * 3) + 1] = fRadius * cosf(v) * sinf(u + uStep);       // y
            spherePoints[((points - 1) * 3) + 2] = fRadius * sinf(v);                         // z              

            points++;
            spherePoints[(points - 1) * 3] = fRadius * cosf(v + vStep) * cosf(u);                  // x
            spherePoints[((points - 1) * 3) + 1] = fRadius * cosf(v + vStep) * sinf(u);            // y
            spherePoints[((points - 1) * 3) + 2] = fRadius * sinf(v + vStep);                      // z

            points++;
            spherePoints[(points - 1) * 3] = fRadius * cosf(v + vStep) * cosf(u + uStep);           // x
            spherePoints[((points - 1) * 3) + 1] = fRadius * cosf(v + vStep) * sinf(u + uStep);     // y
            spherePoints[((points - 1) * 3) + 2] = fRadius * sinf(v + vStep);                       // z

        }
    }        
    return points;
}

In SetupGL I have:

..
glEnable(GL_CULL_FACE);
..
..
glGenVertexArraysOES(1, &_vertexArray);
glBindVertexArrayOES(_vertexArray);

 numPoints=createSphere(sphereVerticies, triangleIndices, 30.0f, 20.0f);

    glGenBuffers(1, &_vertexBuffer);
    glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, _vertexBuffer);
    glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(sphereVerticies), sphereVerticies, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

    glGenBuffers(1, &_indexBuffer);
    glBindBuffer(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, _indexBuffer);
    glBufferData(GL_ELEMENT_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(triangleIndices), triangleIndices, GL_STATIC_DRAW);

    // New lines (were previously in draw)
    glEnableVertexAttribArray(GLKVertexAttribPosition);        
    glVertexAttribPointer(GLKVertexAttribPosition, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, (const GLvoid *) sphereVerticies);

glBindVertexArrayOES(0);

and finally in drawInRect:

glBindVertexArrayOES(_vertexArray);   
    glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, (int)(numPoints*1.5), GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, 0);

Now what am I doing wrong here? I don't see any visual output. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I can see two things:

glVertexAttribPointer(GLKVertexAttribPosition, 3, GL_FLOAT, GL_FALSE, 0, (const GLvoid *) sphereVerticies);

the last argument there should be 0, since the vertices are already buffered and bound in the VBO.

OpenGL ES - glVertexAttribPointer documentation

If a non-zero named buffer object is bound to the GL_ARRAY_BUFFER target (see glBindBuffer) while a generic vertex attribute array is specified, pointer is treated as a byte offset into the buffer object's data store...

And,

glDrawElements(GL_TRIANGLES, (int)(numPoints*1.5), GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE, 0);

you should use GL_UNSIGNED_SHORT because you have more than 255 vertices.


As for the indices, this is how you index them:

                 (0,1,2)        (2,3,0)
 2       3      2              2       3
 o-------o      o              o-------o
 |       |      | \            |     /
 |       |  =>  |   \          |   /
 |       |      |     \        | /
 o-------o      o-------o      o
 0       1      0       1      0

So, from this chart we can see two problems:

1) The triangles do not close up the polygon

2) Notice the winding, the first triangle is CCW, the second CW.

Try this code:

        triangleIndices[index++]=points;
        triangleIndices[index++]=points+1;
        triangleIndices[index++]=points+2;
        triangleIndices[index++]=points+3;
        triangleIndices[index++]=points+2;
        triangleIndices[index++]=points+1;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out two issues, now it shows some output but it still is not correct. The normal of every alternate triangle is opposite. So I see fragmentation in drawing. Is there something wrong with how I'm assigning values to triangleIndices array? Also I'll appreciate if you can suggest a better way of drawing. The method above does not draw all the rectangles of same size, rather the sphere has north pole and south pole where triangles are smaller. This might cause problem in texturing. –  Usman.3D Mar 19 '12 at 8:43
    
See the updated answer and let me know –  arul Mar 19 '12 at 9:22
    
Alright. That was sufficient. –  Usman.3D Mar 19 '12 at 10:25
    
I can only see the sphere from outside. My requirement was to see sphere from inside it. It seems to be the problem of normals now. Will I have to reverse something? BTW, is there a way to discuss these things in real time? :) Also, I have another question, but it will be appropriate to post that in a separate thread. Will wait for your answer there as well. –  Usman.3D Mar 19 '12 at 10:56
1  
Either flip the indices (i.e.: change the winding to CW) : (0,1,2) => (2,1,0) and (3,2,1) => (1,2,3) - or keep face culling disabled. –  arul Mar 19 '12 at 11:02

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