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consider the following code:

>>> x = y = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> x += [4]
>>> x
[1, 2, 3, 4, 4]
>>> y
[1, 2, 3, 4, 4]

and then consider this:

>>> x = y = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> x = x + [4]
>>> x
[1, 2, 3, 4, 4]
>>> y
[1, 2, 3, 4]

Why is there a difference these two?

(And yes, I tried searching for this).

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2  
What is interesting about your last statement, is that this functionality is actually explained in the python docs: docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html#object.__add__ (from searching about those terms) –  jdi Mar 19 '12 at 7:27
1  
@jdl: Yes I admit that I overlooked that. –  S Singh Mar 19 '12 at 7:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

__iadd__ mutates the list, whereas __add__ returns a new list, as demonstrated.

An expression of x += y first tries to call __iadd__ and, failing that, calls __add__ followed an assignment (see Sven's comment for a minor correction). Since list has __iadd__ then it does this little bit 'o mutation magic.

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Thanks, I get it. –  S Singh Mar 19 '12 at 7:28
    
If you want more details on this exact behavior and other insights into why Python is the way it is - I would highly recommend the python epiphanies talk from PyCon 2012. It will lead you to a lot of 'a ha!' moments. –  Burhan Khalid Mar 19 '12 at 8:19
    
@S Singh if you get your answer then please select the answer as accepted answer and complete the workflow. Otherwise this question will be shown as unanswered. –  Lafada Mar 19 '12 at 8:23
1  
This answer is slightly misleading: The assignment is always performed, regardless whether __iadd__() or __add__() is called. list.__iadd__() simply returns self, though, so the assignment has no effect other than rendering the target name local to the current scope. –  Sven Marnach Mar 19 '12 at 15:23

The first mutates the list, and the second rebinds the name.

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