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I want to store null, 0 or 1 values in a mysql column. There will be no other values for that column. null and 0 should be recognised as different values. I'm going to be using either MyISAM or INNODB.

QUESTION: What data type should I use for the mysql column?

EDIT: A lot of answers, thank you! Just one thing though, if possible people give reasoning for using their datatype over others? Thanks.

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Just curious, and this may shed some light on the question: What do the three values represent? "Yes", "no", and "neither", or are you mapping them to something else? –  Wesley Murch Mar 19 '12 at 8:18
    
Sorry for the slow reply. The values are correct, incorrect and unanswered. –  moomoochoo Mar 19 '12 at 10:06
    
@Madmartigan Do you think that (as suggested below) I should use a different value instead of null? –  moomoochoo Mar 19 '12 at 10:24
    
I'd be tempted to use ENUM or even a separate column for unanswered, but with out knowing all the details it's hard to say. If NULLs work for you, I guess TINYINT would do. Probably makes more sense than arbitrary int mappings like 2 == unanswered. ...but what happens when you need another status? Possible? –  Wesley Murch Mar 19 '12 at 10:27
    
Re the status, I hadn't thought about that before. I'm pretty sure though that I won't require any other status in the future. –  moomoochoo Mar 19 '12 at 10:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use boolean.

It actually get defined as a TINYINT(1), but don't worry about that implementation detail.

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I think this might be what I'm looking for. Is there any particular reason you recommend this as opposed to the other data types people have suggested? –  moomoochoo Mar 19 '12 at 10:27
    
We would love to use boolean for our applications, but my boss is opposed to the idea because 'it does not work well with Delphi'. Don't know if other programming languages have problems with the datatypes as well... we end up using a simple TINYINT anyway. –  Konerak Mar 19 '12 at 10:31
    
@moomoochoo Yes: It's probably the most basic datatype there is. It's fortunate that mysql implements it as an int, so it gives you the three values you need (and no others). –  Bohemian Mar 19 '12 at 11:56
    
BOOLEAN and TINYINT are synonyms in MySQL. This will not forbid values of 2, 3, 4, ..., 255, inserted in the column. –  ypercube Mar 19 '12 at 13:24
1  
@ypercube Smarty pants. I'm going to put this down to "mysql does whatever it damn well pleases, when it pleases, and sensible coding be damned" –  Bohemian Mar 19 '12 at 14:32

I would use a tinyint(1) for the column type.

However instead of using a null, I would use a 2 or something. Only reason is I've had a lot of trouble doing queries and searching for a null value.

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No, 2 really is not the same is NULL. NULL holds special meaning, has special behaviour... –  Konerak Mar 19 '12 at 8:12
2  
There's no such thing as 2. –  Wesley Murch Mar 19 '12 at 8:19
    
@tehlulz I did read somewhere on stackoverflow that people could run into trouble with null values. I'm not sure how much of a problem it is going to be for me. Mostly I will just need to tally values :X –  moomoochoo Mar 19 '12 at 10:42

You can use the BIT datatype for this column.


If you want to use TINYINT and still allow only 0, 1 values (and NULL) in the column (this can be useful if you later want to add more possible values in the list allowed values), you can use InnoDB and a Foreign Key constraint to a reference table with just 2 values:

CREATE TABLE Two
( number TINYINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL 
, PRIMARY KEY (number)
) ENGINE = InnoDB ;

INSERT INTO Two(number) 
  VALUES
    (0), (1) ;

CREATE TABLE YourTable
( ...
, thisColumn TINYINT UNSIGNED NULL
, ...

, FOREIGN KEY (thisColumn)        --- this ensures that the column can be only
    REFERENCES Two(number)        --- 0 or 1 or NULL
) ENGINE = InnoDB ;
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You can, but BIT had a bad reputation (Baron's blog). Is that still the case, or is it considered production ready now? –  Konerak Mar 19 '12 at 8:21
    
@Konerak you wouldn't happen to have a link to the blog? –  moomoochoo Mar 19 '12 at 10:30
    
Sorry, I assumed everyone knows his blog (and reads it daily ;)). Here you go. –  Konerak Mar 19 '12 at 10:38
    
Do note that the BIT-bug he reported has been solved since. –  Konerak Mar 19 '12 at 10:44
    
@Konerak Thanks for the link. –  moomoochoo Mar 19 '12 at 12:05

ENUM will be best according to me. That I generally use, works perfect.

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