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I've got the following and was wondering if the initial test is overkill:

static void Main(string[] args) {
    if (args.Length == 0 || args == null) {           
        //do X
    }
    else { 
        //do Y 
    }
}

in other words what I'm asking is are there possibilities of args.Length being zero, or args being null....or would just one of these conditions sufficed?

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4  
Your logic is the wrong way round. What happens if args is null? Checking args.Length will throw a NullReferenceExcetpion –  Greg B Mar 19 '12 at 8:23
    
overkill? not really. unless you absolutely need to provide a response when arguments are required to execute the program, then do it. Greg B is right, check if null then check length. –  Martin Ongtangco Mar 19 '12 at 8:24
    
As a general rule, you should check for null before anything else, because if args is indeed null, your first condition will throw a NullReferenceException. –  Ioannis Karadimas Mar 19 '12 at 8:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Well, Main is defined to never ever ever ever be called with a null parameter. If it does somehow receive a null parameter, then your environment is so broken that all bets are off no matter what you do, so there's really nothing to be gained by checking for null.

On the other hand, if you do check for null, then readers and maintainers of the code will have to understand why. Why did the original programmer put in such a useless check? Did he know something we don't? We can't just remove it, because he might have uncovered some weird corner case bug!

In other words, you're adding complexity to your program, and tripping up future readers of the code. Don't do that. That future user might be you. Make your future self happy, and write code that makes sense.

However, in situations where such a null check does make sense, it must be the leftmost condition.

In a test like this: args.Length == 0 || args == null, args.Length is evaluated first, and if that fails, args is compared to null. In other words, if args is null, your code will throw an exception. It should be args == null || args.Length == 0

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4  
I never said anything about performance. But please tell me how it is bad to rely on your programming language and its class library to do what it says? If you can't rely on that, how can you write any kind of code? If you can't trust that, then every single line you write, including your null check is suspect and unreliable. If you want to talk about terrible practices, then this kind of pointless obfuscation is it. Saying "what if everything in the whole world is corrupt and unreliable? What will we do then? I know, checking for arg == null will fix it". No, it won't. –  jalf Mar 19 '12 at 10:34
3  
If your world is broken, then you can't fix it, and you might as well not bother to try. You can call it "hope" programming if it makes you feel better, but it's the only thing we can do. We have to hope that the compiler generates the code we asked for. We have to hope that the List<T> class actually stores a list of T's, we have to hope that Main will be called on startup. We have to hope that accessing a null object throws a NullReferenceException. Defensive programming can't protect you against a broken language implementation. –  jalf Mar 19 '12 at 10:35
3  
If I was riding a bicyle why would I need to wear a motor bike helmet - in case one day in the future the bicycle sprouts an engine. Surely it's enough to stick with wearing a bicycle hat, like jalf says if somebody gets the bicycle in the future with a motor bike helmet they'll wonder whats going on! (maybe not the best analogy I've thought up) –  whytheq Mar 19 '12 at 12:11
2  
@adelphus: Then you may want to mandate that any rider wear a 10-foot-thick protective suit and parachute, and carry a nuclear missile in case of falling asteroids. Face it, you can't -- and shouldn't! -- protect against every weird thing that might ever happen. Consider (to get back onto the topic :)) that if something calls Main(null), something is fundamentally broken. That something would be the caller, and that's where the fix should go. if (args == null) is a band-aid on a broken leg. –  cHao Mar 19 '12 at 16:40
4  
@adelphus: "This question could easily be asked about any other language." Seriously? So defensive programming is about protecting against the case where your code suddenly turns out to be a different language? I can just imagine it. "Oh shit, the C++ code I've been writing for the last 8 months just turned out to be Prolog! Damn, if only I'd protected against main being called with invalid parameters". This question is about the Main method in one specific language. In this language, Main is called once, by the runtime, at application launch, unless the programmer is insane –  jalf Mar 20 '12 at 9:09

According to this, you only need to check :

if (args.Length == 0)
{
    // Do X
}

Though checking for null doesn't do any harm, there is no real need.

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1  
+1 for Occam's Razor and providing a link. The other answers are correct, of course, for general cases, but this question was very specific. –  Mr Lister Mar 19 '12 at 8:30
    
@InternediateHacker - nice one; I thought I remembered there being an msdn entry just couldn't find it! –  whytheq Mar 19 '12 at 9:53

It's never bad idea to make additional control, if this is not into the high performance, very frequent used functions. So I would say, not, it's not overkill.

And another thing: first check for null, after for Length

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5  
Yes, it is absolutely a bad idea to add code which serves no purpose. It clutters up the code, make it harder to read and to understand, and, quite simply, gives you more code to maintain. Main does not get called with a null parameter, so don't add complexity to your code trying to test for what if it does –  jalf Mar 19 '12 at 8:25
1  
@Tigran: Service packs don't change the language spec to break existing programs. And if they do, then it takes more than a null check to fix your program. If such a service pack was issued, it would break much more than this. But imagine you didn't write this code, but read it. Imagine you had to maintain it. My reaction when reading it would be "what the heck? Why is this null check necessary? Does the original author know something I don't?" –  jalf Mar 19 '12 at 8:35
1  
And then I'd spend the rest of the day trying to uncover whatever bug he was obviously protecting against, and research cases where args could be null. Time wasted because someone introduced unnecessary complexity into his code. If the .NET framework doesn't follow its own spec, we're screwed no matter what we do. Writing your code on the assumption that .NET lies to you is futile –  jalf Mar 19 '12 at 8:36
1  
@Tigran: One day, after some service pack, Console.WriteLine may cause unicorns to appear and format your hard drive. You can't and shouldn't defend against every case that "might" happen in the future -- consider that if such breaking changes were made, you'd have a lot more to worry about than args being null. –  cHao Mar 19 '12 at 8:36
2  
Perhaps I can't. But if not, then you haven't had to maintain a lot of code. Simplicity is important. Understanding why the code looks the way it does is extremely important. If you can't give a good reason for why your code looks the way it wants, I don't want to maintain it. –  jalf Mar 19 '12 at 9:28

If there's no input data, then args.Length is equal to 0, but not null. If there's any input data, then agrs.Length is equal to count of input arguments. In conclusion, args can't be null, but length can be zero.

PS check for null first always

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if (args == null)
{
    Console.WriteLine("args is null"); // Check for null array
}
else
{
    if (args.Length == 0)
    {
        //do X
    }
    else 
    { 
        //do Y 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can simplify this by using if (args == null) { ... } else if (args.Length == 0) { ... } else { ... } and save a layer of curly braces. FWIW, in most cases the branches for null and empty array are probably the same anyway. –  Joey Mar 19 '12 at 8:28
    
@Joey about the brackets I think that this is more readable for others, and about the second comment you're wrong, it case of args is null, Checking args.Length will throw a NullReferenceException! –  Dor Cohen Mar 19 '12 at 8:45
3  
That's why you check first for null and then for Length: if (args == null || args.Length == 0) ... –  Joey Mar 19 '12 at 9:13

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