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I am not a really good JavaScript user but I can get things done with it. I am not proud of the code I have written in JavaScript, so I decided to change that. Here is my first step:

I am trying create my own library for a project and the below is the initial structure.

window.fooLib = {};

(function (foo) {
    "use strict";

    foo.doSomeStuff = function(param1) { 

        console.log(new AccommProperty(param1));
    }

    //some internal function
    function AccommProperty(nameValue) { 
        var _self = this;
        _self.name = nameValue;
    }

}(fooLib));

I used immediately invoked function expression here to initialize my variable. In this case it is fooLib.

I am not sure if I should do some other things to make window.fooLib more safe. I mean it can be overridden by any other code which will run after my code if I understand JavaScript correctly.

What are your thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
use "use strict"; and protect you object, that's all you can do. –  Christoph Mar 19 '12 at 9:03
    
@Christoph I used "use strict;" above as you can see. Is this the right way and place of using it? –  tugberk Mar 19 '12 at 9:05
2  
yep. see john resig's article about how protection can be achieved or the Object.freeze(obj) on developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  Christoph Mar 19 '12 at 9:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to prevent overwriting your variables, you may use Object.defineProperty() with writable:false, configurable:false. In your case:

(function () {
    "use strict";
    var foo = {};
    //some internal function
    function AccommProperty(nameValue) { 
        var _self = this;
        _self.name = nameValue;
    }
    foo.doSomeStuff = function(param1) { 

        console.log(new AccommProperty(param1));
    }
    Object.defineProperty(window, "foolib", {value:foo});
}());

Still, there is no good reason for that. It would need EcamScript 5.1 to work, and there are no shims around; maybe something with getters/setters to prevent overwriting with the = operator.

But also, there should be no need to make your library un-overwritable. Just don't use code on your site that overrides the lib. Or maybe someone even wants to overwrite your functions with another, better lib with the same interface?

If the question is about a library to be shared, with possible namespace conflicts to others, you may have a look at jQuery.noConflict.

share|improve this answer

Every JavaScript object can be overriden. This is the nature of JavaScript and it is impossible to change it. So you cannot make your code safe in that sense.

As for selfinvoked functions: you should use them when you want to have local variables but viisible to all your functions. So in your case AccommProperty is such variable. Defining doSomeStuff inside scope makes no difference unless doSomeStuff will use variables defined inside scope.

So when you want to hide variables from user and/or you need globals and you are affraid of name conflicts use selfinvoked functions.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! changed my example code. It now makes more sense I think. –  tugberk Mar 19 '12 at 8:57

I am not sure if I should do some other things to make window.fooLib more safe. I mean it can be overridden by any other code which will run after my code if I understand JavaScript correctly.

You could try making window.fooLib a local variable instead. Using closures and nested functions one can emulate a namespace where you can put all your data instead of putting it into the global scope or attaching it to window object:

(function() {

    // all functions nested in foo() have access to fooLib.
    fooLib = {}

    fooLib.doSomeStuff = function(param1) { 
        console.log(param1);
        console.log(fooLib); 
    }

    //some internal function
    function AccommProperty() { 
        console.log(fooLib); 
    }

}());

See Javascript Closures: Encapsulating Related Functionality for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
ok but in this case I cannot use fooLib outside of this IIFE and it won't make much sense if I want to create a library. Or am I wrong? –  tugberk Mar 19 '12 at 8:59
    
Your fooLib is attached to window as well... And you need that, to provide external access.(That's the sense of a library?!) Any Object in JS you create (ES3) can be overridden if you don't work with ES5 and protect it. –  Christoph Mar 19 '12 at 9:00
    
@tugberk: you put your whole library in one function that holds library state as local variables. All your library functions become nested functions. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Mar 19 '12 at 9:06
    
Not sure why it was downvoted. Probably by a lost soul who hasn't heard of libraries like jQuery. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Mar 19 '12 at 9:07
1  
@chiborg: The library function is most likely is going to be a constructor function that returns a library object. The code that uses the library has more context to decide where to store the object. Again, see how jQuery works. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Mar 19 '12 at 9:22

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