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I have a constructor for an object Program that validates an argument to make sure it is an integer:

def initialize(programid,*other_args)
  unless programid.is_a?(Integer) then
    raise TypeError
  end
  @programid = programid
  @name = other_args['name']
end

and when I create a new instance

my_prog = Program::new(13453)

It gives me this error:

can't convert String into Integer (TypeError)

Which should not be happening because I'm not trying to do a conversion. Any ideas?

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Your code works for me. Is there something else going on that is called when you call Program:new? What happens if you have puts programid.class before your unless? –  DanSingerman Jun 10 '09 at 16:40
    
Works fine for me too. Can you post a complete program which demonstrates the error? –  mikej Jun 10 '09 at 16:42
1  
Turns out it is related to how I am using *other_args. I thought I could use it as an hash but it seems I cannot @name = other_args['name'] –  NorthWolf Jun 10 '09 at 16:47
4  
If you would like named, optional arguments the common ruby idiom is to define the method with a single, optional argument that defaults to empty Hash e.g. def initialize(programid, options = {}) and then it can be called with something like Program.new(13453, :name => "foo) and you can access options[:name] in the method body –  mikej Jun 10 '09 at 16:54
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2 Answers 2

The error isn't caused by is_a?

"can't convert String into Integer (TypeError)" is caused by this line:

@name = other_args['name']

other_args is an array in your sample code not a hash - that's why ruby is trying to convert "name" into an Integer (and failing)

If you call a method with the keyword argument syntax, it works as though all the keyword args are bundled into a hash which is supplied as the last argument to the method call.

Notice the difference in method declarations:

Yours:

def initialize(programid,*other_args)

Subba Rao's

def initialize(*other_args)

That's a neat simplification - turn all the arguments into a single hash, shift out the first arg (which the code assumes you have). Then provide a default empty hash as an alternative if you didn't supply any other args:

other_args.first || {}
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 class Program
  def initialize(*other_args)
    programid   = other_args.shift
    other_args   = other_args.first || {}
    unless programid.is_a?(Integer) then
      raise TypeError
    end
    @programid = programid
    @name = other_args['name']
    puts @name
    puts @programid
  end
end
Program::new(13453)
Program::new(13453,'name'=>"North Wolf")
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Wow, that's great! Thanks! –  NorthWolf Jun 12 '09 at 16:22
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