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I understand the concept of multiple inheritance though i am trying to access the same method that were given in two interfaces . Example:-

interface Interface1{ 
       int show();
       void display();
}

interface Interface2 {
int show();
void display();
}

class Impl implements Interface1, Interface2 {
       // how to override show() and display() methods such that 
       // i could access both the interfaces
}
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

As interface doesn't have method definitions. it will not matter which interface's show method you are overriding.

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Hi I replied with the same i was asked this in a interview but the guy was not convinced as asked me what if you have to write 2 methods change return types or what ever just give me the functionality of two methods in same class so m bit confused here ..... –  karansingh1487 Mar 19 '12 at 10:20
    
If you are going to change return type, then it depends on what return type you specified in a class which is implementing 2 interface and will override method from that interface which has signature same as you are defining. So if interface1 has int show(); and inerface2 has char show(); and you are writing int show() in your class it will be from interface1 and if you write both then it will be from both interfaces. –  Rahul Borkar Mar 19 '12 at 10:26
    
humm i think u are right ..... –  karansingh1487 Mar 27 '12 at 12:47
    
so i would be able to call both from same class right ?so now i again check what u said ..... –  karansingh1487 Mar 27 '12 at 12:49
    
but this is causing a compilation error could you provide an example ?? –  karansingh1487 Mar 30 '12 at 5:44
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You can implement 2 interfaces with same methods. No compilation error will occur. But when you do so

class A implements Interface1, Interface2
{
}

Then the similar methods of Interface will overridden by the Methods of Interface2. So in your class A there would only one method not two.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

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what if you have to write 2 methods change return types or what ever just to give the functionality of two methods in same class so m bit confused here –  karansingh1487 Jun 21 '12 at 5:32
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Interface1 i1 = new impl();
Interface2 i2 = new impl();
i1.show();
i2.show();

In both the cases, it seems you are calling two different methods of two different interfaces. But as interfaces methods does not have body parts, same method of Impl class will be executed.

So it should not matter through which reference you are calling these methods.

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Hi I replied with the same i was asked this in a interview but the guy was not convinced as asked me what if you have to write 2 methods change return types or what ever just give me the functionality of two methods in same class so m bit confused here ..... –  karansingh1487 Mar 19 '12 at 10:17
    
@karansingh1487 I think that will cause a compilation error. –  Chandra Sekhar Mar 19 '12 at 10:30
    
hummm right but then what is the use of me using two interfaces having same methods ..... instead use one no need for the multiple inheritance then. –  karansingh1487 Mar 27 '12 at 12:47
    
@karansingh1487 There may be some situation, where you may have two methods with same signature but work differently. But in this specific case i don't think it is necessary to have two interfaces. If i am wrong somewhere please let me know my mistake. –  Chandra Sekhar Mar 27 '12 at 12:54
    
hummm k u r right –  karansingh1487 Mar 30 '12 at 5:41
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All an interface does is state that X method will exist in a class. If two interfaces define the same method and if a single class implements both interfaces, then the class will just have the one method. That method will satisfy the requirements of both interfaces. There is no way to define the same method signature twice in a single class in order to have a different implementation per interface.

In other words, in the following code, both calls to show execute the same method:

Impl impl = new Impl();
((Interface1) impl).show();
((Interface2) impl).show();
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Hi I replied with the same i was asked this in a interview but the guy was not convinced as asked me what if you have to write 2 methods change return types or what ever just give me the functionality of two methods in same class so m bit confused here ..... –  karansingh1487 Mar 19 '12 at 10:18
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Interface only provide Contract or you can say restriction to implement some specific things. If two interface provide same Contract(As in your case) then Implementing class will implement only one contract(As there is no difference between two contract).

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Hi I replied with the same i was asked this in a interview but the guy was not convinced as asked me what if you have to write 2 methods change return types or what ever just give me the functionality of two methods in same class so m bit confused here ..... –  karansingh1487 Mar 19 '12 at 10:19
    
@karansingh1487 Java has some restriction. you can not implement two interface in a implementing having same method with different return type(Until they are covarient) in normal way. If you do this compiler will show error. –  kundan bora Mar 19 '12 at 10:32
    
hummm right but then what is the use of me using two interfaces having same methods ..... instead use one no need for the multiple inheritance then.. –  karansingh1487 Mar 27 '12 at 12:46
    
@karansingh1487 Multiple inheritance is not supported by java due to ambiguity(which method to call??). –  kundan bora Mar 27 '12 at 17:03
    
then why do we say that its supported through interfaces ? –  karansingh1487 Mar 30 '12 at 5:35
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@RahulBorkar I do not believe that is correct. If you have two interfaces with the same signature, but different return types, you get the one based on the reference you are using.

For instance, if you create an object and put in in a Instance1 reference, you get the Instance1 method. If you take the same object, put it in an Instance2 reference, you will get the Instance2 method. This is how it seems to work for classes, at least. Its not based on the return type, but the calling type.

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