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I have a js file that is loaded for all pages which contains a popup dialog function:

$(document).ready(function() {

    $('a.popup').on('click', function(e) {
        alert('Show Dialog');
    });
});

This is working when the page is first loaded. However when an object element is udated using:

$(this).html(data);

It seems the a.popup event is not attached anymore. This problem only occurs in IE7+. It works in chrome, firefox and opera. Anyone know what might be causing the issue and a workaround for it?

share|improve this question
    
are you using an updatepanel? – naveen Mar 19 '12 at 10:55
    
what is this? The a.popup? – Bergi Mar 19 '12 at 11:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of:

$('a.popup').on('click', function(e) {
    alert('Show Dialog');
});

Use:

$('body').on('click', 'a.popup', function(e) {
    alert('Show Dialog');
});

See also: http://api.jquery.com/on/

share|improve this answer
    
perfect, this did the job, thanks – xylar Mar 19 '12 at 11:03

From the jQuery API:

Event handlers are bound only to the currently selected elements; they must exist on the page at the time your code makes the call to .on(). To ensure the elements are present and can be selected, perform event binding inside a document ready handler for elements that are in the HTML markup on the page. If new HTML is being injected into the page, select the elements and attach event handlers after the new HTML is placed into the page. Or, use delegated events to attach an event handler, as described next.

Delegated events have the advantage that they can process events from descendant elements that are added to the document at a later time. By picking an element that is guaranteed to be present at the time the delegated event handler is attached, you can use delegated events to avoid the need to frequently attach and remove event handlers. This element could be the container element of a view in a Model-View-Controller design, for example, or document if the event handler wants to monitor all bubbling events in the document. The document element is available in the head of the document before loading any other HTML, so it is safe to attach events there without waiting for the document to be ready.

In addition to their ability to handle events on descendant elements not yet created, another advantage of delegated events is their potential for much lower overhead when many elements must be monitored. On a data table with 1,000 rows in its tbody, this example attaches a handler to 1,000 elements:

$("#dataTable tbody tr").on("click", function(event){
    alert($(this).text());
});

A delegated-events approach attaches an event handler to only one element, the tbody, and the event only needs to bubble up one level (from the clicked tr to tbody):

$("#dataTable tbody").on("click", "tr", function(event){
    alert($(this).text());
});
share|improve this answer

Try to use live function for event binding

See http://api.jquery.com/live/

share|improve this answer
    
live is deprecated, .on() should be used instead. – Houdmont Mar 19 '12 at 11:04

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