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I have an inline if which isn't doing what i thought, and i've distilled it into a console example for clarity.

I thought that the inline if was syntactically the same as the multi-line if, but it looks like it isn't.

foo = "chunky"
(bar1 = foo) if (!defined?(bar1) && foo)
bar1

In this instance, bar1 ends up set to nil. If i restructure it to

foo = "chunky"
if !defined?(bar2) && foo
  bar2 = foo
end
bar2

then it works - bar2 is set to "chunky" (i've used bar2 instead of bar1 in the second example to make sure i was using an undefined variable in each case).

Is it the case that the inline if always sets bar1 to something, defaulting to nil? I thought it just didn't evaluate the part before the if, if the if test returns falsy.

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Related question (possibly duplicate - can't tell): stackoverflow.com/questions/3775402/… –  Andrew Grimm Mar 19 '12 at 21:55
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It fails because as soon as a bareword is seen on the left-hand side of an assignment, it's initialized to nil. Thus when you do (bar1 = foo) if (!defined?(bar1) && foo), bar1 will be nil in the defined? check. Here's a simplified example:

>> defined? foo
=> nil
>> foo = 1 if false
=> nil
>> foo
=> nil
>> defined? foo
=> "local-variable"
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This "If fails because as soon as a bareword is seen on the left-hand side of an assignment, it's initialized to nil." is a key bit of Ruby knowledge that i was previously missing. Thanks! –  Max Williams Mar 19 '12 at 11:48
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