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I have a scenario where I have to update multiple rows in a table using a SQL Server stored procedure.

I am using threading to make updates fast (C# console application + ADO.NET).

Each thread will update different row set from that table.

I am curious about that will it cause any deadlocks in SQL?

More Details:

I have independent threads and they do not share any common resources. I am more worried about SQL locking mechanism as multiple threads are calling same Stored Proc to update same table but different record sets (different rows).

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How many records are you updating? You could set the DataAdapter's UpdateBatchSize to 0 to update all in one batch. Can you show us the SP? –  Tim Schmelter Mar 19 '12 at 13:47
    
I am updating records by caling stored proc. –  Parag Meshram Mar 19 '12 at 13:49
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If one of your threads updates more than 5'000 rows at once, then lock escalation will occur and your row-level update locks will be escalated to table-level update locks, at which point all other threads will have to wait until the thread in question concludes. –  marc_s Mar 19 '12 at 13:52
    
Just to clarify: if all the threads together update more than 5000 rows at once, lock escalation will occur and one thread will get a table-level update lock and lock out all other threads from doing further updates. As long as the threads don't update the same rows, this shouldn't lead to deadlocks, but it could lead to certain updates timing out and rolling back. –  marc_s Mar 19 '12 at 14:15
    
One last thing I would like to confirm. If multiple threads are not updating more than 5000 records then writing a multithreaded application is a good idea... Let me knwo if I am correct. Please note: I am using multithreading to update records as fast as possible. –  Parag Meshram Mar 19 '12 at 14:20
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It should not cause any deadlocks (as long as there are no strange and complicated constraints).

It could cause delays where the threads have to wait for each other when you use heavy TransIsolation like snapshot. But with the default ReadCommitted you should be OK.

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How about lock escalation (from row- to table-level) when more than 5'000 rows are being updated?? –  marc_s Mar 19 '12 at 13:52
    
@marc_s : not familiar with that but it would fall under a "Heavy Tx mode", ie delays but no deadlock. –  Henk Holterman Mar 19 '12 at 13:54
    
True - delays and possibly timeouts - but no deadlocks. –  marc_s Mar 19 '12 at 13:59
    
Okay. Now by my understanding it will not cause any deadlocks but process will delay as one thread will lock the table. Then I guess there is no need to make an multithreaded application for this. Please let me know if my assumption is wrong. –  Parag Meshram Mar 19 '12 at 14:11
    
No, threads will not normally lock the entire table. How close are you those 5.000 rows 9at a time) ? Normally a few threads will be beneficial. –  Henk Holterman Mar 19 '12 at 14:21
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Threading may go deadlock if you dont handle them propeely. If you want to be safe. Just use

Monitor Class 

this will restrict and lock your current thread.

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I have independent threads and they do not share any common resources. I am more worried about SQL locking mechanism as multiple threads are calling same Stored Proc to update same table but different record sets. –  Parag Meshram Mar 19 '12 at 13:51
    
then dont worry about any locks –  The Indian Programmmer Mar 19 '12 at 13:54
    
vote up or accept if u find it as an solution –  The Indian Programmmer Mar 19 '12 at 13:54
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Oh, you should worry about locks! If you update more than 5000 rows, then you'll get a table level lock and all other threads will be blocked. ..... –  marc_s Mar 19 '12 at 13:59
    
@KishoreJangid - Could you please give me the explaination why it wont cause any deadlocks? –  Parag Meshram Mar 19 '12 at 14:08
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If you do not have any relevant indexes on the table you are in for some trouble.

Other than that you should be OK.

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