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I would like to remove all . from a string except from the last.

It can be done in JavaScript like so

var s='1.2.3.4';
s=s.split('.');
s.splice(s.length-1,0,'.');
s.join('');

but when try the same in Perl

my @parts = split /./, $s;
my @a = splice @parts, $#parts-1,0;
$s = join "", @a;

I get

Modification of non-creatable array value attempted, subscript -2 at ./test.pl line 15.

Question

Can anyone figure out how to do this in Perl?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would use a regexp with positive look-ahead in perl for the task:

perl -pe 's/\.(?=.*\.)//g' <<<"1.2.3.4"

Result:

123.4

EDIT to add a fix to your solution using split:

use warnings;
use strict;

my $s = '1.2.3.4';
my @parts = split /\./, $s; 
$s = join( "", @parts[0 .. $#parts-1] ) . '.' . $parts[$#parts];
printf "$s\n";
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2  
Excessive use of printf there when print will suffice. –  TLP Mar 19 '12 at 14:27
1  
Is the way to understand your positive look-ahead like this?: the content in () is carried out first, and because .* is greedy it will find the last . and all .'s the regex meets on its way get replaced with nothing? –  Sandra Schlichting Mar 19 '12 at 14:31
2  
@SandraSchlichting No, the regex will find a literal period, and the look-ahead will assert that there is at least one literal period somewhere further ahead. When the assertion fails, you will have found the last period. –  TLP Mar 19 '12 at 14:35
1  
@TLP: Thanks TLP for the explanation. +1 –  Birei Mar 19 '12 at 14:40
1  
You're welcome. –  TLP Mar 19 '12 at 15:00

First of all, escape the dot in split instruction: my @parts = split /\./, $s;

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Your split is using a regex /./, in which case . is considered the wild card character. If you want to split on a literal period, you need to escape it:

... split /\./, $s;

splice takes arguments ARRAY or EXPR, OFFSET, LENGTH, LIST (perl v5.14). If LENGTH is 0, nothing is removed, and so nothing is returned.

Your code is contradictory to what you say you are trying to do, so I'm not quite sure what it really is you're trying to do, but assuming you want to remove all periods except the last, I would expect you'd do something like:

my @parts = split /\./, $s;
my $end   = pop @parts;
$s        = join "", @parts, ".$end";

Or perhaps manipulate the split

my @parts = split /\./, $s;
my $limit = @parts - 1;  # the field count for split
$s        = join "", split /\./, $s, $limit;

So basically, find out how many fields your string will be split into, subtract one, then perform a new split and set the LIMIT to that.

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The first doesn't handle 1234, and neither handles 1.2.3.4., if it matters. –  ikegami Mar 19 '12 at 20:01

when in doubt, use diagnostics;

$ perl -Mdiagnostics -le " splice @ARGV, -1 ,0 "
Modification of non-creatable array value attempted, subscript -1 at -e line 1 (#1)
    (F) You tried to make an array value spring into existence, and the
    subscript was probably negative, even counting from end of the array
    backwards.

Uncaught exception from user code:
        Modification of non-creatable array value attempted, subscript -1 at -e line 1.
 at -e line 1.

$ perl -Mdiagnostics -le " splice @ARGV, -1 ,0 " argv now not empty

I doubt you want to use negative offsets, I think you want to use offset 0 and size of array minus one (also known as the last index )

$ perl -le " print for splice @ARGV, 0, $#ARGV-1 " a b c
a

Ooops. $#ARGV is the last index, not $#ARGV -1, so

$ perl -le " print for splice @ARGV, 0, $#ARGV " a b c
a
b

but if you still want some arithmetic you can use @ARGV, cause in scalar context its the size of the array

$ perl -le " print for splice @ARGV, 0, @ARGV-1 " a b c
a
b

Side-benefit of using non-negative offsets with splice? It doesn't die when array is empty

$ perl -le " print for splice @ARGV, 0, 10 "
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This looks more like what you were trying to do in Perl

my @parts = split /\./, $s;
$s = join('', splice(@parts, 0, -1)) . '.' . $parts[-1];
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Doesn't handle 1234 or 1.2.3.4., if it matters. –  ikegami Mar 19 '12 at 19:58

You missed the '.' off your splice call. Here's how it should look

use strict;
use warnings;

my $s = '1.2.3.4';

my @parts = split /\./, $s;
splice @parts, -1, 0, '.';
$s = join "", @parts;
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Doesn't handle 1234 or 1.2.3.4., if it matters. –  ikegami Mar 19 '12 at 19:58

The first argument of split is a regular expression. In regular expressions, "." means "match any character" (with /s) or "match any character except LF" (without /s). You need to escape it to match a literal ".".

my @parts = split(/\./, $s, -1);            # "-1" to handle "1.2.3.4."
splice(@parts, -1, 0, '.') if @parts > 2;   # "if" to handle "1234"
$s = join('', @parts);

A substitution could do it as well:

$s =~ s/\.(?=.*\.)//sg;
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