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Here is the query

from a in this._addresses
where a.Street.Contains(street) || a.StreetAdditional.Contains(streetAdditional)
select a).ToList<Address>()

if both properties in the where clause have values this works fine, but if for example, a.StreetAdditional is null (Most of the times), I will get a null reference exception.

Is there a work around this?

Thanks,

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Did you get an exception? Or are you speculating than an exception is possible? –  David B Jun 10 '09 at 18:07
    
I got the exception. –  Oakcool Jun 12 '09 at 18:58
    
If you've got a NullReferenceException for that, you aren't doing a LINQ to SQL query. –  Pavel Minaev Nov 29 '09 at 5:17
    
You could also think about not allowing Street or StreetAdditional to be null. If your db supports default values you could default these to an empty string, set the flag to disallow nulls and obviate the need to null check. –  Tod Dec 13 '11 at 18:39
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8 Answers 8

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The most obvious one:

from a in this._addresses
where (a.Street != null && a.Street.Contains(street)) || (a.StreetAdditional != null && a.StreetAdditional.Contains(streetAdditional))
select a).ToList<Address>()

Alternatively you could write an extension method for Contains that accepts a null argument without error. Some might say that it is not so pretty to have such a method, because it looks like a normal method call, but is allowed for null values (thereby setting aside normal null-checking practices).

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It looks like its working Thanks –  Oakcool Jun 10 '09 at 19:20
2  
Custom extension methods aren't usable in LINQ to SQL. –  Pavel Minaev Nov 29 '09 at 5:16
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I'd use the null-coalescing operator...

(from a in this._addresses
where (a.Street ?? "").Contains(street) || (a.StreetAdditional ?? "").Contains(streetAdditional)
select a).ToList<Address>()
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I would create an extension method to return an empty sequence if null and then call contains method.

public static IEnumerable<T> EmptyIfNull<T>(this IEnumerable<T> pSeq)
{
      return pSeq ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>();
}

from a in this._addresses
where a.Street.Contains(street) || 
      a.StreetAdditional.EmptyIfNull().Contains(streetAdditional)
select a).ToList<Address>()
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Looks somewhat strange because a null-objects seems to be able to invoke member functions. –  Dario Jun 10 '09 at 17:58
    
Upvote for the use of the ?? operator. That's what I would have suggested as well. If you feel that the extension method makes the query look strange you could do without the extension method. –  Jeroen Huinink Jun 10 '09 at 18:04
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You must check first if StreetAdditional is null.

Try

where a.Street.Contains(street) || ((a != null) && a.StreetAdditional.Contains(streetAdditional))

This works because && is a shortcut-operator and if a != null yields false, the second expression with the null-value won't be evaluated since the result will be false anyway.

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I don't think SqlServer gave you a null exception. If it did, then this code is clearly not running though LinqToSql (as you've tagged the question).

string.Contains would be translated to sql's like, which has no trouble at all with null values.

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Check to make sure that the properties are not null

from a in this._addresses
where (a.Street != null && a.Street.Contains(street)) || 
(a.StreetAdditional != null && a.StreetAdditional.Contains(streetAdditional))
select a).ToList<Address>()

If the null check is false, then the second clause after the && will not evaluate.

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from a in this._addresses
where a.Street.Contains(street) || (a.StreetAdditional != null && a.StreetAdditional.Contains(streetAdditional)
select a).ToList<Address>()
share|improve this answer
add comment

You might want to check to make sure the variables street and streetAdditional are not null. I just ran across the same problem and setting them to an empty string seemed to solve my problem.

street = street ?? "";
streetAdditional = streetAdditional ?? "";
from a in this._addresses
where a.Street.Contains(street) || a.StreetAdditional.Contains(streetAdditional)
select a).ToList<Address>()
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add comment

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