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I'm looking for a way to load a page (page A) (which I also create - so not an external page on the web) into an existing page (page B) dynamically. The goal is to influence the behavior of page A in the Javascript/jquery used on page B. Example: when a button in pageA is clicked, I want Javascript on page B to react on this.

I've tried to accomplish this using the jQuery $().load() function, but this doesn't allow me to call the javascript of page B from page A.

The concrete code: my page B contains this:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
    jQuery('#mycarousel').jcarousel({
        initCallback : carousel_callback
    });
});

And I have a function that will add a new tab to the carousel and load content from a page (page A) into this tab.

$('.ref').click(function() {
        var newTabId = jQuery('#mycarousel').jcarousel('size') + 1;
        carousel
                .add(
                        newTabId,
                        "<li style='width: 50%;'><div id='tab" + newTabId + "' style='height: auto;'></div></li>");
        // load content
        $("#tab" + newTabId).load("/researchPad" + $(this).attr('id'));
    });

This works for static content (so when I have static tabs in the carousel). Now I want that this also works for the tabs which are added dynamically.

As one of the reactions suggested, I tried putting the javascript into a separate file and link both the main page as the page which gets loaded to this script. However this doesn't make them share the context.

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2  
Why not include the same javascript on both pages? –  jrummell Mar 19 '12 at 14:58
    
I'll try to make my question more specific (unfortionatly I can't show an example at this time): page B contains a jCarousel which holds the loaded pages. When in page A a button is clicked, a new tab should be added to the carousel in which the new content is loaded. So I don't just need the javascript functions of page B, I also need the context. That's why I'm trying to look for a way to refer to the javascript 'context' of page B from page A. –  user485659 Mar 19 '12 at 15:11
    
So load your html (context) with $.load() and then reference the same js in both pages. Without seeing some code, its hard to understand exactly what you are trying to do. –  jrummell Mar 19 '12 at 15:15
    
I've described the exact problem in the original question. –  user485659 Mar 19 '12 at 18:05

3 Answers 3

I suspect that this might have something to do with it: From the JQuery docs for load():

"jQuery uses the browser's .innerHTML property to parse the retrieved document and insert it into the current document. During this process, browsers often filter elements from the document such as <html>, <title>, or <head> elements. As a result, the elements retrieved by .load() may not be exactly the same as if the document were retrieved directly by the browser."

Where is your javascript in page B? In the head section?

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jQuery has a separate getScript method for loading JavaScript dynamically.

Remove your inline code from page A and place into an external JavaScript file, call it page C. Then, on page B, do something like:

$.load('pageA.html', function(data) {
    $.getScript('pageC.js');
});

That said, I'm willing to bet you can eliminate the getScript entirely by rewriting the code in page C so it operates on .live DOM elements, and loading pageC.js in the usual manner in the <head> of page B.

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Thanks for the suggestion, but it's not exactly what I meant; I've described the exact problem in the original question. –  user485659 Mar 19 '12 at 18:06

after you .load your page, try rebinding your events. for example if you do this

$(button).click(function(){blabla})

before you .load your page, the buttons loaded with .load won't be affected.

i suggest you bind your events in a function and then call it after .load finishes.But don't forget to unbind the existing bindings because of double execution.

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